Photography & Art

Photographer Linda Aronow’s Homage to the L.A. Punk Scene

The Editors

On the weekends, kids flocked from East L.A. and the Valley to Melrose Avenue to buy their Doc Martens and Manic Panic hair dye, and Aronow was everybody’s favorite Goth shopkeeper. In the evenings, Aronow was busy documenting the live music scene of that era, and managed to capture still photos of the most iconic bands of the day over multiple gigs spanning over a decade. For Aronow’s sophomore exhibition, Gallery 30 South is showcasing another assortment of never-before-seen photos from L.A.’s Punk Rock Golden Age.

 

Artist Ewa Pronczuk-Kuziak Defines Happiness in New Solo Show

The Editors

Prończuk-Kuziak’s oil paintings are a combination of still life, nature, and fantasy. The artist creates colored visions of animals that are made of materials, as if woven out of thread and decorative fabrics. Building on contrast, they are full of life, energy, and fantasy, always idealized in their complicated nature and continuous transformation. In her art, the artist uses intensely saturated colors, which illustrate the vibrancy of the world her characters inhabit.

CHG Features ‘Fantastical Beasts’ in New Group Art Show

The Editors

Downtown Los Angeles’s Corey Helford Gallery today unveils its next major group exhibition and most whimsical one yet with Fantastical Beasts, featuring over 50 artists from across the globe. Fantastical beasts have captured our imagination throughout history. Creatures like dragons, griffins and unicorns were the cultural ancestors of natural histories, zoos, and Darwin; of My Little Pony and Animal Planet. Some have their origin in traditional mythology and were believed to be real creatures, while others were based on real encounters.

Remembering the Rockin’, Boisterous Art of Martin Emond

The Editors

Martin Emond was a cartoon illustrator and fine artist who combined elements of old school tattoo and classic sign painting into a sequential art style that drastically changed the look of alternative comics, and whose untimely death occurred as he was on the cusp of achieving mainstream success. Emond’s work was darkly sardonic, and after a stint on the comic strip Accident Man for Toxic! he rose to fame in the United States with Gordon Rennie’s White Trash – the fictional adventures of Elvis Presley and Axl Rose (renamed so as to avoid litigation) on a debaucherous road trip across the southern United States in the former’s pink Cadillac.

Immerse Yourself in Interactive Art at TeamLabPlanets Tokyo

The Editors

The celebrity-favorite and Instagram-famous teamLab Planets Tokyo has become the world’s most popular single-artist destination, drawing in more than 2 million visitors in its first year. The sprawling interactive digital artwork space allows guests to virtually walk through water and immerse themselves in an enhanced world that responds to live movement. Visitors enter the museum barefoot and become completely immersed with other visitors in the vast, enthralling spaces. The artwork is manipulated in real time by a computer program so previous visual states can never be replicated and will never reoccur -- each visitor’s experience is completely unique.

Eric Joyner’s Fantastical Art Pays Homage to Robots and Cartoons in New Solo Show

The Editors

Machine Man Memories is the newest series of fantastical paintings by Joyner, of Robots and Donuts fame. Joyner’s work, which has been licensed from the likes of Disney, Warner Brothers, and the hit HBO show Silicon Valley, depicts the tenuous conflict between children’s toys and adulthood as a portrait of another reality. His work is characterized by his playful and surrealistic style that creates harmony between the mix of cartoon characters, especially Japanese tin robots and colorful donuts (directly inspired by the film Pleasantville) inserted in all kinds of landscapes from the Age of Dinosaurs to the bottom of the ocean.

Artist Frederick Hayes Sheds Light on the Human Condition in New Exhibit

The Editors

Using different media, Hayes sheds light on the human condition as it relates to working-class African Americans, as well as larger communities of men and women. Raised in the South as part of a family that watched the 6-o’clock news, read Ebony and Jet, as well as the local newspapers, Hayes developed a strong interest in picture-making—the basic ideas of looking, recording, and interpreting—and portraiture early on.

Artist Brian Washington’s Tribute to the Heroes of the Civil Rights Movement

The Editors

Washington’s “The Continual Struggle: The American Freedom Movement and the Seeds of Social Change,” is an ongoing body of artwork documenting the Civil Rights Movement and America’s historical struggle against segregation and other forms of race-based injunctions. The 23-piece exhibit vividly recalls a time when people were willing to go into the streets to protest injustice and inequality, according to the artist’s website. “With this exhibit, I hope to elicit the raw emotions from the atrocities African Americans struggled with in years past and bring them to the forefront in today’s cultural lessons,” Washington said.

From Bierstadt to Inness: Celebrating the Art of the American Landscape

The Editors

Cultural identity in the United States has been long intertwined with its magnificent landscapes, from the dense forests of New England to the open terrain of the West. These landscapes extol the unique beauty of this country and relate to the first significant art movement in the United States, known as the Hudson River School. The artists who painted these American landscapes worked during a time of increasing industrialization and growth of technology—not a coincidence of history but a lens on ecocritical thinking of the time. 

Art That Shaped a Nation: 80 Years of Native American Painting

Sandra Bertrand

Arguably, the most haunting work is Deer Dancer for Hyacinth (2001) by Rick Bartow.  (1946-2016).  A Pacific Northwest artist, he fought with addiction and post-traumatic stress that emerges in his dark compositions.  Here, his distorted male figure appears to be in a state of transformation, his head sprouting antlers.  The power of this large pastel, charcoal, and pencil drawing suggests the raw intensity of Austrian painter Egon Schiele’s naked portraits.

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