Photography & Art

Londoners: A Photo Essay

Miguel Lois

Beyond the media spectacle and daily tourists, a parallel world exists within London. A world that seems not to observe the visitor. A reality away from the opulence, the speed and the cosmopolitan daily routine. These are neighbors, people with experiences, or those with more or less truncated lives. People who move silently, unheard, ubiquitous among visitor masses, blind and hardworking.

 

The Art of Oliver Sin

Oliver Sin

Oliver Šin (1985-) is an award-winning Hungarian artist based in Budapest. His influences come from street art, underground and pop culture mixed with scientific interests. The focus of his artworks are built around prophets, visions with dates, real places and existing people. With direct brushwork, he mostly uses unmixed colors structurally, like an abstractionist, but in the service of a narrative agenda. 

Artist Shanequa Gay’s Paintings Shed Light on Homicides in Chicago

Frederick H. Lowe

Unlike some who have thrown up their hands in understandable despair, the shootings and the plight of black men in Chicago and elsewhere have sparked Gay's imagination and creativity. She used her skill as a painter to provoke members of the black community to take a new look at what is happening to their sons, not to look away. Gay's paintings also bid the black community to look at black men as human beings and fathers.

 

Exploring the History of Punk Rock Through Fashion

Gabriella Tutino

Mannequins sporting colored wigs and wearing torn shirts, tartan pants, hardware-embellished dresses and trash bags line the walls; accompanying them are sound bites and video clips of Blondie, the Ramones, Sid Vicious and Patti Smith. This is the set-up for the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s latest Costume Institution exhibit, “PUNK: From Chaos to Couture.”The exhibition takes a look at, and focuses on, the do-it-yourself aspect of punk fashion and how it influenced high fashion. 

Celebrating 50 Years of Artist Llyn Foulkes’ Unvarnished, Unapologetic Vision

Nancy Lackey Shaffer

Ever the maverick, Foulkes was not content to stay with this format, however popular. While he would reference his rock paintings in future pieces, he took a dramatic turn with his “Bloody Heads” series—although “obscured heads” might be a better descriptor. Portraits with faces obstructed by bright red, blood-like strokes or symbolic objects (a doctor’s head, for example, has an X-ray superimposed upon his face, while a geometry teacher has a triangle) are jarring in their juxtaposition of the macabre with the mundane. 

Remembering the Genius of Chris Marker

Steven J. Chandler

Chris Marker wrote in the introduction to his 1997 multimedia CD-Rom Immemory, “I claim for the image the humility and powers of a madeleine.” In that CD-Rom and in many of his other creative endeavors, Marker continued the process of memory’s cartography. He embraced a multitude of genres as mapmaking tools, the span of his work communicating the dependence of the image to its memory. He cobbled together the realities of disparate cultures, mending the breaches in time through preservation of minutia and banality. 

How Pop Art Icon Peter Max Became the Quintessential American Artist

Kristin Sancken

Max’s studio is a massive 10,000 square foot loft on the Upper West Side of Manhattan filled with  photographs of the artist with every president from Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter to Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton, George Bush and, of course, Barack Obama. The rest of the space is filled with paintings of patriotic icons and pop culture subjects: athletes, the New York City skyline, sporting events, even Taylor Swift have somehow come to find refuge in Max’s work. 

The Cool and Capricious World of Artist Josh Agle, a.k.a. Shag

Nancy Lackey Shaffer

Judy Jetson grew up and became a swinger: That’s the impression one might get the first time viewing a Shag painting. The artist Josh Agle—his nom de brosse comes from the SH in “Josh” and the “AG” in Agle—is known for his martini-clutching mod characters in swanky spaces rendered in saturated colors with a distinctive mid-century style. Lithe ladies in bobs and beehives and their cool-cat men lounge on boxy sofas and egg chairs, or sip tropical drinks in bars next to zombies and skeletons while bongo drummers and guitarists play on. 

Young Prodigy Autumn De Forest Sells Six-Figure Paintings to Major Collectors

Autumn De Forest

At the young age of 12, the child prodigy has commissioned six-figure works of art and has garnered national and international acclaim for her colorful tributes to Marilyn Monroe.  Her artistic style has been compared to iconic abstract painters including Andy Warhol, Jackson Pollock and the Picasso. Her exhibitions have defined her as one of the most accomplished and recognized prodigies of our time.  Her original masterpieces have sold for tens of thousands of dollars, and have been acquired by several major art collectors.

How Tattoos Became the Favored Art Form

Emma Mincks

One common reason to get a tattoo is to tell one’s story to the world through a visual representation of an important moment, person, or memory. Tattoo artist Ericksen Reed Linn of Heart and Soul states, “Most of my clients are interested in getting a tattoo to mark some milestone in their life.” Tattoos are a form of self-expression, except that they are so much more communal than traditional art. The tattooist and the client experience the creation of the piece simultaneously, and the person getting inked entrusts their personal story, not to mention part of their body, to the artist.  

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