Photography & Art

A Photographer Explores Facets of American Identity

Stephen Marc

The recently published book American / True Colors (GTF Publishing) is an exploration—from coast to coast—of who we are as Americans. Photographer Stephen Marc captures American identity and sense of place -- from the perspective of a baby-boomer African-American documentary/ street photographer. Marc shows the rich gestures of a new American culture that are performed, displayed, and exchanged every day, representing hot issues such as immigration, gender identity, civil and women’s rights, cultural diversity, patriotism, community and police violence, sports and play, and popular culture.

Sue Coe’s Combustible Art Takes on Donald Trump

Sandra Bertrand

 A laser-sharp political awareness doesn’t flourish in a vacuum and studying at the Workshop for People’s Art had exposed Sue Coe to the poster art and library sources that fueled her imagination.  If the likes of Rembrandt, Goya, and Kathe Kollwitz filled her nascent eyes, expressionist Otto Dix and social muralist Jose Clemente Orozco heightened it further.  She visited prisons, AIDS wards, even slaughterhouses to peel the layers of her vision clean. 

A Photographer’s Fascination With the Natural Beauty of the Florida Coast

Anthony J. Peritore

Anthony J. Peritore’s captivation with Cape Canaveral and Merritt Island was set in motion by his initial National Geographic assignment. His experience in photographic equipment management and specialty in remote image capture for aviation brought him to Florida’s Space Coast to photograph the inaugural Space Shuttle launch, continuing with two decades of assignments. On his days off, Peritore was drawn to Merritt Island, a gathering place of the Atlantic Flyway bird migration route.

Art and Artists Continue to Thrive Despite COVID

Merl Ross

This work I now refer to as my “Pandemic Kitchen Table Paintings.” It was rewarding to work small and sense the completion of a painting, usually after a few days of concentrated effort. My art has always been about that intersection of imagination and experience and allowing for the unexpected occurrence. These new watercolor and gouache paintings on paper are part of the “Daydream Series” and provide an opportunity for me to dive into my imagination reflecting on my memories and emotions.

How One Grieving Artist Turned Tragedy Into Art

Sandra Bertrand

Before the September 11, 2001, attacks, before the current pandemic, grief of such cataclysmic proportions seemed unimaginable for many.  But when sculptor Suse Lowenstein’s son Alex, along with his schoolmates, was lost in the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, on December 21, 1988, unimaginable grief became a tragic reality for her.  The question was, how to survive it?

Legendary Photographer Burk Uzzle Sees All

Sandra Bertrand

But his true pleasure is in showing us the old masters, his face lighting up with a child’s excitement.  We peer closely along with Uzzle as he shows us how to look at a painting as if it were a photograph, finding new meaning in the color black or the chiaroscuro effect of dark and light on a subject’s face.  As for faces, he sees each one as a new frontier, “as deep a frontier as you’re capable of exploring.”

Artist Arinze Stanley Delves Into the World of the Paranormal

The Editors

Inspired by his personal experiences growing up in Africa and the current cultural and political state of society, Stanley is driven to create drawings that trigger an emotional connection between the viewers and his artworks. Using his works as a form of social and political activism, Stanley hopes to use his art to speak for those who can’t speak for themselves Regarding his new series, Stanley says, “My art is born out of the zeal for perfection both in skill, expression, and devotion to create positive changes in the world."

New York’s Central Park Pays Homage to the Suffrage Movement

Sandra Bertrand

The original design focused on Anthony and Stanton, with a scroll containing quotations from more than 20 other suffragists.  The Design Commission eliminated the scroll, leaving only the two white women.  What was missing and what became crucial to its ultimate equal rights message in the wake of growing criticism was Sojourner Truth, the African-American abolitionist and suffragist. By Truth taking her place at the table, the monument was complete.  For Bergmann, with less than a year to her deadline, there was no time to waste.

How Mid-Century Airline Travel Came to Symbolize Glamour and Adventure

M.C. Hühne

The airline industry was highly regulated until the late 1970s, when deregulation in the United States started a trend to liberalize air traffic around the world. Until then, ticket prices and the destinations an airline was allowed to serve were the main subjects of regulation. Airlines were regarded as important agents for economic growth as well as ambassadors of their home countries abroad, and regulation was to provide stable economic conditions for this promising new industry.

Artist Michael Murphy Pays Homage to 20th-Century Architecture in His ‘Modernism’ Series

The Editors

Eventually, Murphy started selling his art at local retailers and galleries. By 2010, Murphy stopped looking for employment as an architect and concentrated on his art, working out of a studio in his home that he shares with his architect wife. His “Forgotten Modernism” series -- currently featured at Gallery 30 South – which is an ongoing catalog of modern architecture, focuses not just on the masterpieces of 20th-century California, but also the middle-class dwellings that helped define the spirit of the West Coast.

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