Film & TV

Craig, Daniel Craig: How James Bond Was Reinvented

Ben Friedman

Director Sam Mendes’ Skyfall and Spectre capture the maturation of Daniel Craig into that of Ian Fleming’s classic character. While Casino Royale and Quantum of Solace showcase a more brutal and relentless Bond, Mendes’s direction depicts a more physically restrained Bond. The action sequences are breezier. As Craig ages, so does Bond, and thus there is a reliance on more guns, gadgets, and intelligence behind his fighting style.

‘Spirit Quest’ Attempts to Combine Stoner Comedy and Strong Characters, and Ends Up With Neither

Ulises Duenas

The basic premise of the movie is that two friends are on a trip to the desert where they decide to eat a bunch of mushrooms that will hopefully take them on a spirit journey. Tip is there to get over a recent breakup, and his friend Brent is his self-appointed spiritual guide. While their friendship and interactions are the core of the film, they don’t have great chemistry together for comedy.

‘The Weasels’ Tale’ Delivers Great Characters and Unexpected Twists and Turns

Ulises Duenas

The chemistry among these four characters is great. Mara is stuck living in the past and sees her jaded friends Norberto and Martin as tormentors for wanting her to confront the reality that the good days are long gone. They constantly take small jabs at each other but are much more overtly hostile towards the realtors trying to manipulate Mara. While Mara is clearly delusional and self-centered, you do feel sympathy for her to some degree.

'No Time to Die' Is James Bond at His Best

Forrest Hartman

In a new video, Highbrow Magazine writer and film critic Forrest Hartman discusses Daniel Craig's last turn as James Bond in 'No Time to Die." Hartman praises Craig for his performance as 007 throughout the Bon franchise, and gives his latest film 3 1/2 stars.

“What?” Shows the Struggles of a Deaf Actor Looking for a Break

Ulises Duenas

John Maucere plays Don who is trying to break out into movies despite constantly getting looked over because of his lack of hearing. He has a one-man show that always pleases small crowds, but he doesn’t consider himself successful because the audience is always entirely deaf. The earlier parts of the movie are slow, yet they do a good job of establishing Don’s character and his plights as a deaf man in a superficial business.

Thriller 'COPSHOP' Delivers Gore and Violence, but Not Much Else

Forrest Hartman

In an new video, Highbrow Magazine writer and film critic Forrest Hartman reviews director Joe Carnahan's latest thriller, COPSHOP, which stars Gerard Butler. Typical of Carnahan's films, COPSHOP delivers the usual gore and violence, but the storyline is nothing new and is reminiscent of his previous films. Hartman gives the film 2 1/2 stars.

The Legacy of Marvel Comics’ ‘What If,’ and Its Implications Within the Marvel Cinematic Universe

Ben Friedman

The brilliance in this creative strategy means What If can feel unimportant. In a franchise that has now created infinite universes, focusing on one singular universe that is not taking place on Earth-19999 can feel insignificant. While it is a spectacle to see Captain Carter punch Nazis, witness Hank Pym kill the Avengers, or see all the heroes as zombified versions of themselves, ultimately, they are one-offs.

‘Space Jam,’ ‘Free Guy’ and the New Corporate Media

Garrett Hartman

In  film,  however,  there  is  only  a  finite  amount  of  content.  You  can’t  just  watch something  unrelated  to  the  story.  The  film  is  the  story.  Bonus  content  and  features  are  sometimes  packaged  with  films,  but  this  optional  content  is  not  as  big  of  a  component  to  the  film  as  open-world  exploration,  multiplayer, or  arcade  modes  are  to  videogames. Anything over  the  top  than  a  sly  reference  will feel  like  advertising,  as  opposed  to  the  slight  nods  to  the  audience  they’re supposed  to  be.  

‘Ted Bundy: American Boogeyman’ Misses the Mark

Ulises Duenas

Tone is important in a movie like this and the first few scenes make it hard to determine what kind of tone the director was shooting for. At first, it seems like a serious look at Bundy’s crimes, but the music and writing feel like they’re from an old VHS slasher flick. The whole soundtrack feels very ‘80s, which is odd considering the movie takes place in the 1970s.

Can the Golden Globes Make a Comeback?

Forrest Hartman

The controversy over the Golden Globes continues. But can the Globes make a comeback? In a new Highbrow Magazine video, longtime Highbrow Magazine writer and respected academic Forrest Hartman discusses the ongoing controversy surrounding the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, and wonders when and how the Golden Globes will regain the respect of the industry.

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