NAWA Presents TRANSPARENCY Exhibit at Arts Club of Washington

Sandra Bertrand

TRANSPARENCY is a challenging theme—it can suggest a translucence or clarity of light shining through a subject to make it more visible.  But it can also provide the artist a rare opportunity of exploring the social or psychological implications as well, such as that which is free of pretense.  Whether handled in a realistic or more abstract style, the 56 artists on display provide a wealth of interpretations.

Roger Federer Pursues Titles, Not Top Ranking

Stephanie Nebehay

Roger Federer is no longer chasing the top ranking and would rather be a contender at Grand Slams than battling Novak Djokovic and Rafa Nadal to be world number one, the Swiss tennis great said on Friday. The 20-times Grand Slam champion has held back the clock in the twilight of his remarkable career and became the ATP’s oldest world number one last year a few weeks after clinching his sixth Australian Open at the age of 36.

How to Age Gracefully Via a Healthy Diet

Brandpoint

"Try substituting fish into meals a few times a week," says Jackson Blatner. "Americans tend to eat less fish than people in other parts of the world, and they are missing out on great-tasting protein that's packed with omega-3s." Omega-3s support brain and heart health, two important considerations as you age. In fact, Mayo Clinic doctors believe that omega-3s reduce the risk of dying of heart disease.

Jenn Segal and the Art of Food

Tara Taghizadeh

A classically trained chef from the Washington D.C. area, who also lived and cooked in France and once worked at the renowned L’Auberge Chez Francois,  Segal’s philosophy centers around the easy access, culinary joy – and above all – diverse and delicious tastes of food. In her cookbook (also named Once Upon a Chef), published in April 2018 to much acclaim, foodies can discover 100 easy-to-follow, family-friendly recipes that won’t break the bank. 

World’s Largest Rainforests Face Political Uncertainty in 2019

Sara Stefanini

Meanwhile in Indonesia, the two presidential candidates – incumbent Joko Widodo (known as Jokowi) and ex-army officer Prabowo Subianto – have given vague promises of environmental protection but few details. That said, Jokowi, who won as an outsider populist in 2014, has done more than some expected to tackle deforestation. As of 2015, Brazil was home to 12 percent of total forest global cover, the DRC nearly 4 percent and Indonesia 2 percent, according to the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization. 

Celebrating the Diversity of the 2019 Oscars

Nsenga K. Burton

Ruth Carter earned a nomination for Best Costume Design and Hanna Beachler is nominated for Best Production Design for Black Panther. It is lovely to see Carter, whose amazing body of work goes back to 1988 with Spike Lee’s School Daze, is finally getting the recognition she deserves, having long been honored in African-American film circles. Beachler’s nomination makes her the first African-American to be recognized in this category. Spike Lee’s first-ever nomination for Best Director for BlacKkKlansman is also history-making.

Stories of Migration Highlight New Exhibit, ‘Documented: The Community Blackboard’

The Editors

The interactive piece is community-based, and as such, is continually transformed by its participants, who are invited to write their own story of migration and post their family photos onto the gallery walls. A collage-like bilingual sound piece, streaming into the space, weaves together Muriel Hasbun's own reflections on migration as gathered from oral testimonies and other aural impressions  recorded in El Salvador.

A Brief History of the Jigsaw Puzzle

Brandpoint

Puzzling has been around since the dawn of time (almost). Greek mathematician Archimedes puzzled around 250 B.C. to solve geometry problems. He cut a square into 14 pieces, and then examined how many different configurations could be made from those 14 pieces. This puzzle was recently solved by Bill Cutler, a mathematician from Cornell University, who showed the puzzle has 536 truly distinct solutions.

The Republic Torn Asunder in Ben Fountain’s ‘Beautiful Country Burn Again’

Lee Polevoi

In Beautiful Country Burn Again, Fountain revisits the tumultuous 2016 presidential campaign. Interspersed with his vivid, on-the-scene reportage are sections he calls “Book of Days,” a more or less objective compilation of world events taking place in the months leading up to Election Day. (It makes for grim reading.) He also theorizes at length about something he calls The Third Reinvention, addressing—with the hopes of reforming or eliminating—wealth inequality, white supremacy, and damage already inflicted on the democratic system.

Hilma af Klint: Paintings for the Future

Sandra Bertrand

Several years before the world was welcoming the gigantic proponents of modernism, such as Wassily Kandinsky, Kazmir Malevich, and Piet Mondrian into the mainstream, af Klint was quietly creating her dazzlingly bold and colorful swirls, her biomorphic shapes and rectilinear constructions.  The pull of the outside world had little interest for her.  So little, in fact, that she stipulated that no one would see her creations until 20 years after her passing.  

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