The Art of Frances Glessner Lee: Shrinking Evil

Stephanie Kane

In the 1940s, a Chicago heiress turned the notion of a dollhouse on its head. Tapping into the power and intimacy of miniature dwellings, Frances Glessner Lee constructed 18 tiny scenes of violent death set in rooming houses, rustic cabins, garages, attics—even a nursery. Lee’s crime scene dioramas may be a trifle outdated, but time has not robbed them of any of their power.

My Surprise in Getting Married at 49

Eric Green

What I envisioned in my future retirement years was moving south to an efficiency apartment in Miami Beach, where I figured there’d be lots of other old single guys like me enjoying the sunshine and beach. I didn’t consider myself much of a catch because I was cynical about love, and especially since I dressed so poorly in sweatshirts and ragged jeans--but ironically, what I wore did lead to romance. I credit my 20-year-old winter overcoat for that.

 

Anita Shapolsky Gallery Features More Masters of Abstraction

The Editors

Anita Shapolsky gallery is currently presenting "Masters of Abstraction," that takes place in the virtual world of the Hamptons Art Fair. This group show is composed of artists who are known for their strong, lyrical, expressive brushstrokes; their use of color; and their ambitious geometric compositions. Featured artists include: Seymour Boardman, Ernest Briggs, Amaranth Ehrenhalt, Ethel Schwabacher, Yvonne Thomas, and Jeanne Miles.

'No Time to Die' Is James Bond at His Best

Forrest Hartman

In a new video, Highbrow Magazine writer and film critic Forrest Hartman discusses Daniel Craig's last turn as James Bond in 'No Time to Die." Hartman praises Craig for his performance as 007 throughout the Bon franchise, and gives his latest film 3 1/2 stars.

Love, Friendship Are Forged Amidst Conflict in ‘War With No Name’

Adam Gravano

The final installment of the series that is on the shelf, D'Arc, resumes Sebastian and Sheba’s story, just after Mort(e) has come to its dramatic end. The friends are pressed into service once more, for a more developed society that has resurfaced after the close of the main events of the War With No Name. Our friend, Sebastian, at this stage, would like to be left alone, but trouble finds him – and Sheba, too.

Facebook Is ‘Operating in the Shadows,’ Whistleblower Tells Congress

France 24

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg hit back Tuesday at claims the social media giant fuels division, harms children and needs to be regulated, saying the claim the company puts profits over safety is "just not true." "The argument that we deliberately push content that makes people angry for profit is deeply illogical," Zuckerberg wrote in a note to Facebook employees that he then posted on his account, hours after a whistleblower testified before U.S. lawmakers.

“What?” Shows the Struggles of a Deaf Actor Looking for a Break

Ulises Duenas

John Maucere plays Don who is trying to break out into movies despite constantly getting looked over because of his lack of hearing. He has a one-man show that always pleases small crowds, but he doesn’t consider himself successful because the audience is always entirely deaf. The earlier parts of the movie are slow, yet they do a good job of establishing Don’s character and his plights as a deaf man in a superficial business.

What Drives the Writing Process?

Mark Tarallo

These stories began back when I was in my 20s. I was truly lucky to have many friends who were smart, creative, considerate, skilled, collaborative, not needlessly difficult, and a pleasure to be around. I knew that, in the working world, they would be huge assets and great team members at any organization they worked for: Yet, so many of them seemed to have managers that were making their work lives miserable. 

Mega-Cities Face Peril as Climate Change Intensifies

Christina Conklin and Marina Psaros

In his major post-storm speech, Mayor Michael Bloomberg noted that in 2050, one-quarter of the city’s land and 800,000 residents would be within the one-hundred-year flood zone. But instead of talking about the devastation as an opportunity to reshape the city’s shoreline to better reflect future sea levels and more frequent storm surges, he doubled down. “As New Yorkers, we cannot and will not abandon our waterfront. It’s one of our greatest assets. We must protect it, not retreat from it,” he said.

Intrigue and Deception Fuel Rebecca Starford’s ‘Unlikely Spy’

Lee Polevoi

Evelyn is charged with infiltrating the Lion Society, a group of homegrown fascists whom the authorities fear might help Hitler and the war effort. She conducts herself with maybe a little too much savoir faire, given that this is her first undercover experience, but soon enough the society’s members ask her to supply classified information from the British War Office. Then she discovers a surprising personal connection among the Nazi sympathizers—a connection that will return to haunt her in the years after the war.

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