Desperately Seeking Sasquatch in John Zada’s ‘Valleys of the Noble Beyond’

Lee Polevoi

John Zada went on multiple journeys to the Great Bear Rainforest in British Columbia for his new book, In the Valleys of the Noble Beyond. In small towns and villages, Zada meets many people who claim to have seen the Sasquatch, “the alleged race of half-man, half-ape giants” on the loose in the wild. Like its distant counterpart, the Yeti, a rumored denizen of the Himalayans, the Sasquatch, aka Bigfoot, has purportedly left behind footprints and engaged in random encounters with hunters, fishermen, and members of the Kitasoo, Heiltsuk, and other First Nation peoples.

 

Why Are Children’s TV Shows So Strange?

Linda Geddes

A 2D cutout of a lamb spins down onto a plain green screen while the narrator says: “It’s a lamb.” The same thing happens twice more. Then the whole sequence repeats again, only this time, the narrator says “One, two, three,” as each lamb lands. It’s boring. It’s repetitive. But when the same babies who watched Baby Einstein were shown this, their eyes tracked the arrival of each lamb, suggesting that they were engaged and following it.

Crime Junkies: The Peculiar Rise of True Crime Podcasts on Spotify

BPT

Listening to podcasts on Spotify grew by more than 50 percent in 2019, and true crime is one of the most popular genres, with My Favorite Murder with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark and Crime Junkie as some of the most streamed true crime podcasts on the platform in 2019. In 2020, fans can look forward to a fresh batch of true crime podcasts, including the infamous stories of Michelle Carter, Chris Watts, Henry Lee Lucas and Samuel Little, which are expected to launch throughout February and March.

Still Rowdy, Raucous & Rockin’: L.A. Landmark Barney’s Beanery Turns 100

The Editors

Travelers, as a rite of passage, would leave behind countless out-of-state license plates to prove to the world they had arrived in the promised land. Those license plates still decorate the bar at Barney’s Beanery today. Embraced by Hollywood royalty as a down-to-earth alternative to the region’s growing number of snooty formal dining establishments, Barney’s soon became a home away from home for such early movie stars as Clara Bow, John Barrymore, Jean Harlow, Clark Gable, Errol Flynn and Bette Davis.

With the Best Picture Nominations, the Oscars Unleashed the Monsters’ Journey

Neil Gordon

In examining the daunting reality we face every day, we consider the journey of the monster who perpetuates it. And when we consider the journey of this monster from beginning to end, we see how the nightmare unfolds. It’s common for us to see someone like a psychopath (Jojo Rabbit) or a sociopath (The Irishmanand trace their history back to a point or a series of points of trauma. Without this confluence of events, they may not have turned out to be as destructive as they are. They experience hardship at an early, tender time, and thus their worldview is tainted from then on.

From Bierstadt to Inness: Celebrating the Art of the American Landscape

The Editors

Cultural identity in the United States has been long intertwined with its magnificent landscapes, from the dense forests of New England to the open terrain of the West. These landscapes extol the unique beauty of this country and relate to the first significant art movement in the United States, known as the Hudson River School. The artists who painted these American landscapes worked during a time of increasing industrialization and growth of technology—not a coincidence of history but a lens on ecocritical thinking of the time. 

Rejecting Peace Plan, Palestinians Cut Ties With Israel and U.S.

Omar Fahmy and Ulf Laessing

Abbas said he did not want Trump to be able to say that he, Abbas, had been consulted. He reiterated his “complete” rejection of the Trump plan, presented on Tuesday. “I will not have it recorded in my history that I sold Jerusalem,” he said. The blueprint also proposes U.S. recognition of Israeli settlements on occupied West Bank land and of Jerusalem as Israel’s indivisible capital. The Arab League foreign ministers meeting in Cairo said the plan did not meet the minimum aspirations of Palestinians.

 

Art That Shaped a Nation: 80 Years of Native American Painting

Sandra Bertrand

Arguably, the most haunting work is Deer Dancer for Hyacinth (2001) by Rick Bartow.  (1946-2016).  A Pacific Northwest artist, he fought with addiction and post-traumatic stress that emerges in his dark compositions.  Here, his distorted male figure appears to be in a state of transformation, his head sprouting antlers.  The power of this large pastel, charcoal, and pencil drawing suggests the raw intensity of Austrian painter Egon Schiele’s naked portraits.

From Global Flavors to Plant-Based Cooking: Food Trends for 2020

BPT

Clean eating means eating foods without additives and artificial ingredients. Today's diners and home cooks demand transparency about ingredients and preparation. People interested in clean eating want to see respect for the ingredients. In other words, they want to be able to recognize everything that's on the plate. They want their food to be less processed, with as few additives as possible — resulting in big, bold natural flavors.

Corey Helford Gallery Pays Homage to the Cinematic Genius of Frederico Fellini

The Editors

Participating artist from Italy, Nunzio Paci, shares his inspiration: "I watched Juliet of the Spirits many times. The artwork in the group show reflects my current exploration of the natural world and its connections with the dream sphere, nostalgia and memory, all themes in common with Fellini's oeuvre." Missouri-based artist Lauren Marx sees a connection between her work and Fellini’s artistic eye and cinematography: "I see similarities with the use of religious imagery, earthy imagery, baroque and fantastical themes. I can also see a slight connection between the composition of my piece and some of the beautiful compositions he created.”

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