At the Brooklyn Museum: Latin-American Women Artists Take a Stand

Sandra Bertrand

The curators of this extraordinary and, at times, exhaustive exhibition have set their sights on bigger game than such philosophical conundrums. Organized by the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles and the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art at the Brooklyn Museum, it is the first exhibit to present the contributions of Latin American and Latina women during a period not only of exceptional experimentation but one in which profound political and social turmoil was rampant throughout Latin American countries. 

Surprising Facts About the Carbon Footprint of Your Favorite Foods

Soila Apparicio

Blanket agricultural production doesn’t work across the world, and it’s important to consider local ecosystems when looking at how best to produce food with the lowest carbon footprint. A vegetarian typically has a smaller carbon footprint than a meat-eater but the plant-based diet isn’t practical everywhere, especially for those who live in dry or cold places that cannot support the growth of most vegetable crops.

The World According to Trump: North Korea Is ‘No Longer a Nuclear Threat’

Rae Ann Varona

“One trip and it’s ‘mission accomplished,’ Mr. President?” tweeted Rep. Adam B. Schiff (D-Calif.), adding that North Korea was still in possession of its nuclear missiles and that the promise was still vague. “North Korea is a real and present threat.  So is a dangerously naive president.”Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.), also highlighting North Korea’s possession of nuclear weapons and intercontinental ballistic missiles, said the U.S. was still in danger.

 

Summer 2018’s Trendiest Wines Hail From South Africa

Brandpoint

The Big Easy White offers an amazing array of tropical fruits, showing the complexity and charm the Cape has to offer. This wine is crafted with 100 percent Chenin Blanc, and has an easy-drinking, unwooded style. Its big appeal is due to its flavors being pleasant, refreshing and approachable. The tropical palate is richly textured with hints of wild herbs and Indian spice, adding complexity and good depth. 

Artist Jonathan Lyndon Chase Debuts Solo Exhibition in Los Angeles

The Editors

Drawing from his everyday experiences, Chase examines the relationship between space and gender as social constructs; the ways in which gender identity is affected by our immediate environment and the dominant societal norms that exist within that space. For “Sheets,” Chase delves further into this idea of gender performativity, using spatial obscurity as a means of protecting his autobiographical subjects from the trappings of ethno-cultural stereotypes and societal expectations. 

‘Ocean’s 8’: The Art of Scamming in NYC

Anne Branigin

Ocean’s 8, in theaters Friday, takes scamming to the next level, adding another chapter to the Ocean’s franchise, which originated in 1960 with Sinatra as Danny Ocean. Three more Ocean’s films, starting with Ocean’s 11 in 2001, revolved around the debonair Ocean (played by George Clooney) and his motley crew of scammers and con artists, each operating like cogs in a well-oiled machine, to pull off improbable and glamorous scams. Ocean’s 8 riffs on the same formula, this time with Danny’s sister at the center. 

Travis Burke and the Art of Adventure Photography

The Editors

Over the past four years, Burke has amassed almost 800,000 followers on Instagram and his photos have been published in Backpacker Magazine and on the cover of National Geographic Magazine.  Along his journey, the avid athlete can be found walking slacklines over canyons, freediving through caves in the ocean and pushing himself and the boundaries of his craft. He’s enjoyed living in the van his grandmother gave him, which he converted into the ultimate “adventure mobile” -- affectionately known as Betty the Grey Wolf.   

Fox News and the Lurking Specter of Censorship

Steve Bassett

Last March, retired Army Lieutenant Colonel Ralph Peters, the network’s National Security Analyst, added to the turmoil when he emailed colleagues he was quitting after 10 years because he was “ashamed” of what his employer had become. Implicit but not stated in Peters’s diatribe, is the lurking specter of censorship. He accused the network’s primetime hosts of “dismissing facts and empirical reality to launch profoundly dishonest assaults” against the network’s targeted enemies. 

Yosvany Terry Brings His Afro-Cuban Brand of Jazz to D.C.

Eve M. Ferguson

Born into a musical family, Terry’s father Eladio “Don Pancho” Terry was a bandleader, violinist and master shekere player in his hometown of Camaguey, which has also produced other Cuban musical luminaries such as Omar Sosa. Schooled at the prestigious National School of Arts (ENA) and Amadeo Roldan Conservatory in Havana, Yosvany aspired to play the violin like his father, but was instead guided to the saxophone and continues his father’s unique playing style on the shekere.

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