A Brief History of Whisky, the ‘Water of Life’

Beth Kaiserman

“Whiskey” is used for whiskeys made in Ireland and North America.  “Whisky” is used for those made in Canada, Japan, Scotland, and Wales. Your best bet is to go by what’s on the label of the bottle. (For example, Maker’s Mark is labeled as bourbon “whisky,” even though it’s made in Kentucky.) Though “scotch” has become ubiquitous, it is simply known as “whisky” in Scotland.

 

Increasing Numbers of Smokers Seek Help Online to Quit

Brandpoint

Researchers found that the number of smokers who searched online for information on quitting tobacco more than doubled over the past 12 years, from 16.5 percent in 2005 to 35.9 percent in 2017. In 2017, an estimated 12,434,691 U.S. smokers searched online for information. The findings underscore the role of internet resources in tobacco control efforts and how they can impact public health.

Two Killers Haunt 1950s London in ‘Death in the Air’

Lee Polevoi

Winkler describes these disparate events in impressive detail. She offers a chilling description of how abysmal government policies, combined with a bout of truly terrible weather, created the slaughterhouse effects of 1952. She writes with verve and sympathy about a handful of Christie’s victims, and seems to capture with disturbing accuracy the killer’s mental state as he commits and then hides the evidence of his monstrous crimes. 

A New Grace Jones Documentary: ‘Bloodlight and Bami’

Dwight Brown

Born in Jamaica (1949) and raised outside of Syracuse, New York, she was a shy, repressed daughter of a Pentecostal minister. It was no wonder that Grace rebelled — big time. By the 1960s she lived in a New York City hippie commune, was a go-go-dancer and heralded the effects of LSD. A blossoming modeling career took her to Paris in the ‘70s, where she did runway for Yves St. Laurent, appeared on the cover of Vogue and was roommates with fellow models Jerry Hall and Jessica Lang.

Travels in the Kimberley, Western Australia

Brandpoint

The best way to experience the Kimberley is through expedition cruising. A unique collection of companies operate boats that take passengers to the region’s most pristine beaches and reefs, to towering waterfalls so close you can feel the fresh mist on your face, through ancient gorges, and to 350-million-year-old rock formations. Through expedition cruising, you will likely place your footstep where no one before you has ever been. 

Binh Danh: The Ghosts of Khmer -- Light and Memory

Lisa Sette Gallery

An homage to both contemporary photographic theory and the black and white binary that defined early photography, the intensely argent surfaces of Danh’s works present a secondary imagery resembling a double exposure, a vibration of shadow and light around the composition’s edges. Whether in the stark chambers of injustice or the luminous expressions of monumental gods, Danh’s images record a secret energy at play in all human endeavors. 

Why ‘Roseanne’ Is Actually a Documentary

Michael Harriot

In the post-Obama era, America was all-too-willing to explain how racism was a thing of the past. After all, what could be a greater symbol of America’s progress on race relations than an African American president? As soon as Obama took office white people began collectively washing their hands as if they were brain surgeons who had removed a hate tumor. Instead of realizing that prejudice was just hiding behind artificially-whitened smiles, they pointed to Oprah, Tyler Perry and Olivia Pope as evidence that racism had gone the way of smallpox, the Dodo bird and the upper lips of any Caucasians older than 32. 

The Photographs of Eliot Hess: Japan

Eliot Hess

Eliot Hess is a lifestyle and travel photographer, currently exhibiting at Williams McCall Gallery in Miami Beach. His work reveals the culture, history and beauty of Cuba, Cartagena, India, Morocco, Peru, Croatia, Southeast Asia, and elsewhere throughout Europe. He lives in Miami Beach and travels frequently to photograph. Hess is also the co-owner of HWH PR, a leading high-tech public relations agency, and author of bestselling The Munchies Eatbook published by Random House. 

How the Eccentric Coen Brothers Became American Film Icons

Christopher Karr

Think of drastically different genres. Fuse some with others and add new elements. Borrow patterns, themes and impressions from the halls of movie history and blend them with postmodern philosophy, a wickedly self-deprecating sense of humor and a heavy dose of playful ironic detachment. The resulting mixture pays homage to directors such as Stanley Kubrick, Roman Polanski, Sam Raimi and Preston Sturges, and writers like  William Faulkner, Flannery O’Connor, James M. Cain and Raymond Chandler. I’m referring to none other than the work of Joel and Ethan Coen, the modern American maestros of cinematic cross-breeding. 

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