Photography & Art

Jasper Johns at The Whitney: The Magician at Play

Sandra Bertrand

Death as a theme has a place in the artist’s obsessions. Later paintings depict skeletons as part of the imagery with a lightheartedness that makes one think the artist at 91 has come to terms with the issue of mortality. One work places the skeleton over an original silhouette of the artist from his own shadow. Another earlier and more somber image is based on a 1965 war photograph by Larry Burrows with Marine corporal James Farley crumpled in grief over the death of a comrade. 

Croatian Street Art Festival Features Renowned International Artists

The Editors

This year’s VukovART street art festival in Vukova, Croatia, featured a number of international street artists, including Boa Mistura from Spain, BustArt from Switzerland, Jana Brike from Latvia, Juandres Vera from Mexico, Mr Woodland from Germany, Victor Splash from Russia, Artez from Serbia, Kerim Mušanović from Bosnia and Herzegovina, Šumski from Croatia, and Marion Ruthardt from Germany.

The Art of Frances Glessner Lee: Shrinking Evil

Stephanie Kane

In the 1940s, a Chicago heiress turned the notion of a dollhouse on its head. Tapping into the power and intimacy of miniature dwellings, Frances Glessner Lee constructed 18 tiny scenes of violent death set in rooming houses, rustic cabins, garages, attics—even a nursery. Lee’s crime scene dioramas may be a trifle outdated, but time has not robbed them of any of their power.

Anita Shapolsky Gallery Features More Masters of Abstraction

The Editors

Anita Shapolsky gallery is currently presenting "Masters of Abstraction," that takes place in the virtual world of the Hamptons Art Fair. This group show is composed of artists who are known for their strong, lyrical, expressive brushstrokes; their use of color; and their ambitious geometric compositions. Featured artists include: Seymour Boardman, Ernest Briggs, Amaranth Ehrenhalt, Ethel Schwabacher, Yvonne Thomas, and Jeanne Miles.

Corey Helford Gallery Unveils Exhibit Celebrating Anniversary of ‘The Little Prince’

The Editors

Saint-Exupéry, a pioneering aviator, best-selling writer and humanist, wrote The Little Prince in 1943. First published in New York, the book was published three years later in France in 1946. Timeless in its imagery and message, the story continues to resonate with readers of all ages through its themes of respect for humanity, friendship, authenticity, and charity. To date, the book has sold over 200 million copies.

Artists’ Visual Journeys Through Mental Health

The Editors

The title of the exhibit, Put It To The Fire, references centuries-old healing rituals practiced across the globe, where fire is used as a metaphorical cleanser, releasing unwanted energies, mindsets, and attachments in order to create space for new intentions to grow and thrive. The exhibit intends to address multiple aspects of the mental health journey: from pain to healing, and suffering to hope.   

Photographer Isabel Muñoz Showcases Her Japan Series

The Editors

The Mougins Center for Photography will present Munoz’s recent works: a series produced in Japan, the result of several trips between 2017 and 2020. Most of the photographs and videos have never been published before. They express the photographer’s preferred techniques, namely the platinum print and large formats.

Pinky Violence: Shock, Awe, and Liberation in Japanese Exploitation Films

Matt Kennedy

These films are still considered exploitation films in the same sense that most 1980s  horror and comedy films from the U.S. can also be categorized as exploitation. They have nudity, violence, and sometimes even torture and bondage, but what separates the Toei films from their lesser  competitors are the victories achieved by the protagonists – often against incredible adversity, and invariably with a social message.

Deana Lawson at the Guggenheim – The Black Lens Transformed

Sandra Bertrand

In recent years, Lawson has admitted to creating environments for the work itself, in order to allow for the reflection “of both looking and being looked at” she desires from her audience. Her portraits are framed in mirrored glass, so that standing at a certain angle in front of a portrait one confronts the self. Where holograms in the portraiture are embedded, does it detract or enhance the overall effect?  It’s hard to say.

The Amazons Are Back for a Summer of Pop Art in France

The Editors

On the occasion of the Musée d’Art Moderne et d’Art Contemporain de Nice’s 30th anniversary, the She-Bam Pow Pop Wizz! The Amazons of Pop exhibition plunges back on a  strong axis of Nice history: the  face-off between France and the United States and movements of appropriation between New Realism and Pop. Behind the French-American artist Niki de Saint Phalle, the emblematic figure of the museum’s collection, a whole  generation  (European  and  North  American) of amazons of art is being honored.

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