Photography & Art

Corey Helford Gallery Unveils Exhibit Celebrating Anniversary of ‘The Little Prince’

The Editors

Saint-Exupéry, a pioneering aviator, best-selling writer and humanist, wrote The Little Prince in 1943. First published in New York, the book was published three years later in France in 1946. Timeless in its imagery and message, the story continues to resonate with readers of all ages through its themes of respect for humanity, friendship, authenticity, and charity. To date, the book has sold over 200 million copies.

Artists’ Visual Journeys Through Mental Health

The Editors

The title of the exhibit, Put It To The Fire, references centuries-old healing rituals practiced across the globe, where fire is used as a metaphorical cleanser, releasing unwanted energies, mindsets, and attachments in order to create space for new intentions to grow and thrive. The exhibit intends to address multiple aspects of the mental health journey: from pain to healing, and suffering to hope.   

Photographer Isabel Muñoz Showcases Her Japan Series

The Editors

The Mougins Center for Photography will present Munoz’s recent works: a series produced in Japan, the result of several trips between 2017 and 2020. Most of the photographs and videos have never been published before. They express the photographer’s preferred techniques, namely the platinum print and large formats.

Pinky Violence: Shock, Awe, and Liberation in Japanese Exploitation Films

Matt Kennedy

These films are still considered exploitation films in the same sense that most 1980s  horror and comedy films from the U.S. can also be categorized as exploitation. They have nudity, violence, and sometimes even torture and bondage, but what separates the Toei films from their lesser  competitors are the victories achieved by the protagonists – often against incredible adversity, and invariably with a social message.

Deana Lawson at the Guggenheim – The Black Lens Transformed

Sandra Bertrand

In recent years, Lawson has admitted to creating environments for the work itself, in order to allow for the reflection “of both looking and being looked at” she desires from her audience. Her portraits are framed in mirrored glass, so that standing at a certain angle in front of a portrait one confronts the self. Where holograms in the portraiture are embedded, does it detract or enhance the overall effect?  It’s hard to say.

The Amazons Are Back for a Summer of Pop Art in France

The Editors

On the occasion of the Musée d’Art Moderne et d’Art Contemporain de Nice’s 30th anniversary, the She-Bam Pow Pop Wizz! The Amazons of Pop exhibition plunges back on a  strong axis of Nice history: the  face-off between France and the United States and movements of appropriation between New Realism and Pop. Behind the French-American artist Niki de Saint Phalle, the emblematic figure of the museum’s collection, a whole  generation  (European  and  North  American) of amazons of art is being honored.

Corey Helford Gallery Showcases New Multi-Artist Show

The Editors

Jane Lee, aka Messy Desk, creates pieces that are full of joy, with her characters, animals, and happy faces interwoven between buildings. The pieces are carefully crafted, stroke after stroke, and the result is high-density landscapes with an explosion of color. Frantic as it might be at first glance, after close inspection, Messy Desk’s art is full of emotional stories, like treasures hidden in plain sight, waiting to be discovered. 

L.A. Artist Castro Frank Presents New ‘Ethereal’ Photographs

The Editors

Frank’s art has been exhibited in numerous solo and group exhibitions across California, including South Grand, Rvcc Gallery, Communion Gallery, and Embed Gallery. The popularity of his work led to commissions from musicians as well as television networks utilizing his work in their stage design. His work has also been featured in large public installations and charity campaigns with nonprofit organizations, such as INCLUSIVACTION.

Brentwood Arts Exchange Introduces ‘From Dusk 'Til Dawn’ Exhibit

The Editors

This group exhibition -- 'From Dusk 'Til Dawn' -- at the Brentwood Arts Exchange features artists whose diverse disciplines center around aesthetic and conceptual themes of personal journey, from pain to promise. Participating artists include: Gayle Friedman, Emily Fussner, Tim McLoraine, and Alex Porter.

Alice Neel -- a Collector of Souls – at the Met

Sandra Bertrand

Alice Neel's long overdue retrospective, People Come First, is currently drawing hordes of visitors at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. It’s no surprise, considering she based her entire life and career around the intimates and strangers that surrounded her. Every class, race, and gender came under her razor-sharp gaze.  And no human being encountering her subjects comes away unscathed. 

 

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