Photography & Art

The Paintings of Tennessee Williams

The Editors

“The fact that Williams painted, much less that he painted in Key West, is a surprise to many and his paintings have mostly remained outside of the public eye. We are honored to have these works here at the Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU, and to be one of the few museums that David Wolkowsky has selected to exhibit these works outside of their Key West home,” according to Susan Gladstone, the Executive Director of the Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU

Paris Painters Take on Onslaught of Encroaching Cafes

Jack Hunter

For decades, the artists of Montmartre have dazzled sightseers with their rapidly delivered portraits, paintings of Parisian scenes and cartoonish caricatures. But now the painters are threatening to fold up their easels and relocate elsewhere in the French capital, accusing restaurateurs of encroaching on their space.“It’s very difficult to paint now – it’s almost impossible,” said painter Midani M’Barki, 70. “We are now working in the gutter. Is it normal for artists to be put in the gutter?”

Capturing the Graffiti and Street Art of Porto, Portugal

John David Rowley

The best way to discover Porto is on foot, allowing you to explore its many nooks and crannies, from steep staircases and laundry-festooned alleyways to huge, tree-lined avenues with monumental buildings and many churches. One thing you notice almost immediately is the graffiti. As with many southern European cities, graffiti is rampant. There is a lot of “tagging,” the modern equivalent of writing “Kilroy was here,” I suppose, but somehow not nearly as charming or attractive.

The Magic and Beauty of India: A Photo Essay

Eliot Hess

I was lucky to have visited India during the “Spring Festival of Playing Holi” or the “Festival of Colors.” It is a Hindu festival that is celebrated by smearing, or throwing, colored chalk at others and then spraying water to make the colors run. Everyone is fair game. The trip left me with a lasting sense of spiritualism and beauty. I felt peace and harmony as never before. Even though there is obvious poverty in many regions of the country, there is still a sense of contentment you can’t find anywhere else.

‘Deconstruction: A Reordering of Life, Politics and Art’ at the Frost Art Museum

The Editors

"A Reordering of Life, Politics and Art" comes from the prophetic messages in the 1967 book The Society of the Spectacle. More than 50 years ago, this book foreshadowed our reliance on isolating handheld technology and the 24-hour news cycle that dominates our times. The author Guy Debord warned about "a future world where social interactions become too influenced by images that would prevent us from direct personal contact." 

The Art of Blayne Beacham Macauley

The Editors

Blayne Beacham Macauley is a painter based in Atlanta, Georgia. She studied Plein Air oil painting in Venice Italy at the Scuola Internazionale di Grafica and Studio Art at Boston University. She uses symbols to create abstract paintings, which represent exact moments in her life.  Her work has been featured in Atlanta Homes & Lifestyles, Southern Living and Southern Seasons Magazine. Macauley’s art explores the idea of the human soul.  As a soul travels through life, it changes.  It grows, learns, and is damaged by life events.  Certain moments in time can permanently impact a soul. 

New Exhibit Focuses on Life of Legendary Press Agent Charlie Cinnamon

The Editors

The exhibition features more than 100 historic items curated from Cinnamon’s personal archives, from his childhood growing up in the Bronx during the 1920s, all the way through 2016. Photos and ephemera span the more than 60 years Charlie Cinnamon reigned as the country’s most beloved press agent for America’s leading arts organizations and national public affairs campaigns for major institutions an companies. He was singularly respected by several generations of journalists for his honesty and integrity, from the time he started working in the 1940s until his recent passing. 

At the Brooklyn Museum: Latin-American Women Artists Take a Stand

Sandra Bertrand

The curators of this extraordinary and, at times, exhaustive exhibition have set their sights on bigger game than such philosophical conundrums. Organized by the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles and the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art at the Brooklyn Museum, it is the first exhibit to present the contributions of Latin American and Latina women during a period not only of exceptional experimentation but one in which profound political and social turmoil was rampant throughout Latin American countries. 

Artist Jonathan Lyndon Chase Debuts Solo Exhibition in Los Angeles

The Editors

Drawing from his everyday experiences, Chase examines the relationship between space and gender as social constructs; the ways in which gender identity is affected by our immediate environment and the dominant societal norms that exist within that space. For “Sheets,” Chase delves further into this idea of gender performativity, using spatial obscurity as a means of protecting his autobiographical subjects from the trappings of ethno-cultural stereotypes and societal expectations. 

Travis Burke and the Art of Adventure Photography

The Editors

Over the past four years, Burke has amassed almost 800,000 followers on Instagram and his photos have been published in Backpacker Magazine and on the cover of National Geographic Magazine.  Along his journey, the avid athlete can be found walking slacklines over canyons, freediving through caves in the ocean and pushing himself and the boundaries of his craft. He’s enjoyed living in the van his grandmother gave him, which he converted into the ultimate “adventure mobile” -- affectionately known as Betty the Grey Wolf.   

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