Photography & Art

Zoe Leonard at the Whitney: Artist as Anthropologist

Sandra Bertrand

The eye moves warily over images that at first feel disjointed, even disorienting. The black and white photos are intentionally left uncropped, their black borders adding to their mystery and power.  Even the dates the shots were taken and produced are a noteworthy item of interest to the artist.  A series of clouds seen from a plane window; aerial images of a New York City landscape, somehow make the grid of buildings below appear removed and anonymous from the life that you know pulsates below. 

Binh Danh: The Ghosts of Khmer -- Light and Memory

Lisa Sette Gallery

An homage to both contemporary photographic theory and the black and white binary that defined early photography, the intensely argent surfaces of Danh’s works present a secondary imagery resembling a double exposure, a vibration of shadow and light around the composition’s edges. Whether in the stark chambers of injustice or the luminous expressions of monumental gods, Danh’s images record a secret energy at play in all human endeavors. 

The Photographs of Eliot Hess: Japan

Eliot Hess

Eliot Hess is a lifestyle and travel photographer, currently exhibiting at Williams McCall Gallery in Miami Beach. His work reveals the culture, history and beauty of Cuba, Cartagena, India, Morocco, Peru, Croatia, Southeast Asia, and elsewhere throughout Europe. He lives in Miami Beach and travels frequently to photograph. Hess is also the co-owner of HWH PR, a leading high-tech public relations agency, and author of bestselling The Munchies Eatbook published by Random House. 

NAWA Features Exhibit in Honor of Women’s History Month

The Editors

The National Association of Women Artists, Inc. (NAWA) in NYC is currently exhibiting through March 28, 2018, Celebrate Women! in Honor of Women’s History Month.  Six member artists, Sandra Bertrand, Nancy Coleman Dann, Susan G. Hammond, Natalia Koren Kropf, Leah Raab and Carol Richard-Kaufmann have chosen to interpret this theme in a variety of arresting ways.

Thomas Cole: A Transatlantic Look at America’s Greatest Landscape Painter

Sandra Bertrand

The Oxbow, The Connecticut River near Northampton (1836) is one of the central masterpieces of this exhibit, once again addressing nature untamed with the inevitable advent of civilization. A darkly vulnerable landscape is played out against the order of agriculture, with crops growing in the calm of a sun-stroked sky. It’s a gorgeous composition, the eye traversing the snaking river throughout.

Abstract Expressionist Gems at the Anita Shapolsky Gallery

Anita Shapolsky

These works adhere to the gallery’s focus of abstract expressionist style, but offer an eclectic variety of genre, medium and eras. It exposes rare drawings, prints, photographs and paintings from some of the most significant artists of the 1950s and 1960s. This show follows our tradition of representing important artists from all backgrounds to the public. 

The Art of Modigliani – The Man Behind the Mask

Sandra Bertrand

One of the most telling exhibit quotes by the artist is as follows: “Always speak out and keep forging ahead.  The man who cannot find a new person within himself is not a man.”  For Modigliani, the decisive move toward metaphorical abstraction was absolute.  One senses in the later paintings and sculpture a no-turning-back sensibility; he was ready to toss his hat in with the gods of the ancients. French colonialism was making West African sculptures and other ritualistic objects available for study back home and Picasso and Matisse took note. 

The New Museum Takes Aim With ‘Trigger: Gender as a Tool and a Weapon’

Sandra Bertrand

There are those pieces that elicit delight, exhibiting an entrepreneurial spirit as much as shock value.  Vaginal Davis, a Los Angeles-born, Berlin-based transgender artist has created a generous series of small abstract wall reliefs in a blood-red mixture of nail polish, Aqua Net hair spray and other Dollar Store beauty supplies. A more formalistic abstraction is offered by Ulrike Muller’s geometric enamel on steel pictures, exhibiting a clean mastery of minimalism and grace.  

New Exhibit Features Works of Photojournalist Ruth Gruber

Staff

The show features more than 60 photographs including gelatin silver prints plus an archival trove of personal letters, telegrams, printed magazines, and assorted ephemera documenting the artist’s career. The photographs in this exhibition span more than 50 years, from Gruber’s groundbreaking reportage of the Soviet Arctic in the 1930s and iconic images of Jewish refugees from the ship Exodus 1947, to her later photographs of Ethiopian Jews in the midst of civil war in the 1980s.

‘Nasty Women/Bad Hombres’: Determination and Daring at El Museo del Barrio

Sandra Bertrand

Many of the artists represented were uprooted from the Dominican Republic and Leslie Jimenez expresses the social disparity in her Humble Heroes from the Stroller Stories of New York series.  Images of domestic workers and their charges are created by intricately weaving polyester thread on vellum.  These are small, painstaking works of great beauty.  Regina Viquerra’s large violet bouquet constructed entirely of plastic bags is noteworthy, mainly as an example of the esthetic possibility in found objects.  

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