Photography & Art

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner: A German Expressionist on Fire

Sandra Bertrand

Kirchner’s move to Berlin in 1911 allows his signature style full play and is never more evident than in his Berlin Street Scene (1913-14).  The placement of his prostitutes with their plumed hats and furs shows a mastery of perspective.  The artist has thrust the women and their male partners in a rhythmic march towards the foreground, creating an inescapable tension. The action comes to an abrupt stop with a male subject front and center with his back to the viewer.  This painting was co-acquired in 2006 and Director Renee Price sees it as a work of “pointed social critique,” one that’s central to their mission.

The Art of Paul Luikart

The Editors

Paul Luikart is a writer and artist living in Chattanooga. He is fascinated by the role that paint plays and what it can do in the process of making a painting. Characteristic of Luikart’s work is the thick application of paint, sometimes applied with palette knives and brushes, and sometimes with old baseball cards and scrap mat board. Bold colors, long drips down the canvas, and layers upon layers give the paint its own say, so to speak, in his creations.

A Spotlight on the Unique, Contemporary Arts Scene in Baltimore

The Editors

This diverse, four-person group exhibition highlights the vibrant and unique character of the contemporary art scene in Baltimore County. By displaying various visual disciplines, these artists - selected by curator, educator and fellow artist Schroeder Cherry - give a vibrant and dynamic visual definition of Baltimore's unique flavor, cementing the area's nationally renowned reputation as a groundbreaking nexus for the arts.

Eco-Feminist Artist Mira Lehr’s Reverence for Nature

The Editors

Now, more than 70 years later, the artist has created powerful new work that calls attention to today’s pressing issues ─ saving the planet and protecting the environment. "My creation of art has always been based on nature, but now I am more dedicated to ecology and saving the planet. We are all in a terrible dilemma now; the planet is suffering and is in danger. People need to be aware of the danger that is threatening all of us, and we have to work together to reverse this situation," saysLehr.

NAWA Celebrates Its 130th Annual Members’ Exhibition

Sandra Bertrand

NAWA’s recent exhibition at One Art Space in the heart of New York City’s Tribeca district was a testament to their tenacity and truly something to celebrate. The diversity, originality and sheer excellence of artworks on display were a stunning achievement. Although a sizable number of awards are given out every year, it’s a daunting responsibility for the highly professional curators chosen for each annual. 

Lowbrow Meets Highbrow at Gallery 30 South’s Coaster Show

The Editors

Combining the quirky, the vibrant and the storytelling aspects of art, Gallery 30 South has set up an exhibit of hundreds of artful coasters displayed in a storyboard fashion along the walls of the gallery. Beer coasters (like those you can find at your local bar or restaurant) have been transformed from a disposal, functionary object into a canvas for one-of-a-kind art pieces.The show, founded by Gallery 30 South owner Matt Kennedy in 2013, features the works of some of the most important, young artists of today.

Do Artists Make the Best Curators? Guggenheim Reveals Groundbreaking Exhibit

Sandra Bertrand

A three-dimensional sensibility is at work at the Guggenheim’s first ever artist-curated exhibition, Artistic License: Six Takes on the Guggenheim Collection.  The first dimension is the initial shock of the viewer confronting the artworks; the second is the awareness as you move from one selection to the next, that there’s another mind, the curator’s, at work.  The third dimension as you move through the six levels of the rotunda, is the merging of the viewer’s take along with the curator’s own into a rich, sometimes disorienting, dizzying impression.

Paying Homage to the Genius of Black Artists

Sandra Bertrand

The film is strongest when it focuses on the individual artist, in some instances a long-overlooked glimpse into lives we often didn’t know existed.  Take, for instance, Edmonia Lewis, whose sculpture “Forever Free” from 1867 is an artistic marvel in white marble.  It portrays a black man and child, sculpted in a classical style that could stand beside any Greek sculpture in a major museum.  Lewis eventually went into exile in Rome, undoubtedly seeking out a more accepting environment for her inspiration. 

From West to East: The Blazing Trail of Abstract Expressionist Artists

A. S. Editors

While the CSFA cultivated its own, unique school of abstract art, it also exposed its students to New York abstract artists like Mark Rothko and Ad Reinhardt through summer sessions from 1947 to 1949. For students like Hultberg, Rothko's guest lectures about the New York art scene were inspiring enough to convince them to continue their studies on the East Coast. Briggs, Calcagno, and Schueler followed suit after 1950, a migration catalyzed by Still's decision to move to New York and the subsequent firing of MacAgy.

The Light That Shines on Germany

Eliot Hess

Family and friends ask me why I travel as much as I do. There is a simple answer to this question: to see the world while I can. I love to photograph the unexpected. I love showing others that the world is filled with wonderful surprises that bring us all together in peace and harmony. I never expected that Berlin, Nuremberg, Munich and the Bavarian countryside and their residents would be so welcoming. Given Germany’s turbulent and dark history, one would perhaps expect a different experience.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Photography & Art