Photography & Art

The Art of Blayne Beacham Macauley

The Editors

Blayne Beacham Macauley is a painter based in Atlanta, Georgia. She studied Plein Air oil painting in Venice Italy at the Scuola Internazionale di Grafica and Studio Art at Boston University. She uses symbols to create abstract paintings, which represent exact moments in her life.  Her work has been featured in Atlanta Homes & Lifestyles, Southern Living and Southern Seasons Magazine. Macauley’s art explores the idea of the human soul.  As a soul travels through life, it changes.  It grows, learns, and is damaged by life events.  Certain moments in time can permanently impact a soul. 

New Exhibit Focuses on Life of Legendary Press Agent Charlie Cinnamon

The Editors

The exhibition features more than 100 historic items curated from Cinnamon’s personal archives, from his childhood growing up in the Bronx during the 1920s, all the way through 2016. Photos and ephemera span the more than 60 years Charlie Cinnamon reigned as the country’s most beloved press agent for America’s leading arts organizations and national public affairs campaigns for major institutions an companies. He was singularly respected by several generations of journalists for his honesty and integrity, from the time he started working in the 1940s until his recent passing. 

At the Brooklyn Museum: Latin-American Women Artists Take a Stand

Sandra Bertrand

The curators of this extraordinary and, at times, exhaustive exhibition have set their sights on bigger game than such philosophical conundrums. Organized by the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles and the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art at the Brooklyn Museum, it is the first exhibit to present the contributions of Latin American and Latina women during a period not only of exceptional experimentation but one in which profound political and social turmoil was rampant throughout Latin American countries. 

Artist Jonathan Lyndon Chase Debuts Solo Exhibition in Los Angeles

The Editors

Drawing from his everyday experiences, Chase examines the relationship between space and gender as social constructs; the ways in which gender identity is affected by our immediate environment and the dominant societal norms that exist within that space. For “Sheets,” Chase delves further into this idea of gender performativity, using spatial obscurity as a means of protecting his autobiographical subjects from the trappings of ethno-cultural stereotypes and societal expectations. 

Travis Burke and the Art of Adventure Photography

The Editors

Over the past four years, Burke has amassed almost 800,000 followers on Instagram and his photos have been published in Backpacker Magazine and on the cover of National Geographic Magazine.  Along his journey, the avid athlete can be found walking slacklines over canyons, freediving through caves in the ocean and pushing himself and the boundaries of his craft. He’s enjoyed living in the van his grandmother gave him, which he converted into the ultimate “adventure mobile” -- affectionately known as Betty the Grey Wolf.   

Zoe Leonard at the Whitney: Artist as Anthropologist

Sandra Bertrand

The eye moves warily over images that at first feel disjointed, even disorienting. The black and white photos are intentionally left uncropped, their black borders adding to their mystery and power.  Even the dates the shots were taken and produced are a noteworthy item of interest to the artist.  A series of clouds seen from a plane window; aerial images of a New York City landscape, somehow make the grid of buildings below appear removed and anonymous from the life that you know pulsates below. 

Binh Danh: The Ghosts of Khmer -- Light and Memory

Lisa Sette Gallery

An homage to both contemporary photographic theory and the black and white binary that defined early photography, the intensely argent surfaces of Danh’s works present a secondary imagery resembling a double exposure, a vibration of shadow and light around the composition’s edges. Whether in the stark chambers of injustice or the luminous expressions of monumental gods, Danh’s images record a secret energy at play in all human endeavors. 

The Photographs of Eliot Hess: Japan

Eliot Hess

Eliot Hess is a lifestyle and travel photographer, currently exhibiting at Williams McCall Gallery in Miami Beach. His work reveals the culture, history and beauty of Cuba, Cartagena, India, Morocco, Peru, Croatia, Southeast Asia, and elsewhere throughout Europe. He lives in Miami Beach and travels frequently to photograph. Hess is also the co-owner of HWH PR, a leading high-tech public relations agency, and author of bestselling The Munchies Eatbook published by Random House. 

NAWA Features Exhibit in Honor of Women’s History Month

The Editors

The National Association of Women Artists, Inc. (NAWA) in NYC is currently exhibiting through March 28, 2018, Celebrate Women! in Honor of Women’s History Month.  Six member artists, Sandra Bertrand, Nancy Coleman Dann, Susan G. Hammond, Natalia Koren Kropf, Leah Raab and Carol Richard-Kaufmann have chosen to interpret this theme in a variety of arresting ways.

Thomas Cole: A Transatlantic Look at America’s Greatest Landscape Painter

Sandra Bertrand

The Oxbow, The Connecticut River near Northampton (1836) is one of the central masterpieces of this exhibit, once again addressing nature untamed with the inevitable advent of civilization. A darkly vulnerable landscape is played out against the order of agriculture, with crops growing in the calm of a sun-stroked sky. It’s a gorgeous composition, the eye traversing the snaking river throughout.

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