News & Features

The Hemingways After Ernest

Nataliya Nedzhvetskaya

There is perhaps no name more widely renowned in modern American literature than Hemingway. The Hemingways after Ernest continue to intrigue both those well-acquainted and those less familiar with his work. The continued fascination with the Hemingway name  poses a question: What  do we expect from the children of fame? Though we prize family traditions (Francis Ford and daughter Sofia Coppola), we are equally compelled by differences (Gloria Vanderbilt and son Anderson Cooper). Do genetics predetermine greatness or is upbringing to blame?

The Story of the Rise and Fall of the Cayman Islands

Steven Knipp

Grand Cayman Island, famously described as a sunny place for shady people, owes its extraordinary rise and equally spectacular fall to three people: expat lawyer Bill Walker, best-selling novelist John Grisham and President Barack Obama. This tiny coral-encrusted British territory has long claimed to be the world’s fifth-largest financial center, routinely ranked with Hong Kong, Zurich and London. More than a trillion US dollars are said to be parked in Cayman, most of it in 8,000 trust funds (75 percent of the world’s registered trust funds).

Why the San Francisco Thought Police Give Liberals a Bad Name

Tara Taghizadeh

Oh, how the mighty have fallen. Once upon a time, the San Francisco Bay Area was a haven for liberals, who found a welcoming home in the city and environs that gave rise to the Free Speech Movement; became a sanctuary for war objectors; and whose politics proved a thorn in the backside of the right-wing then-governor, Ronald Reagan. But the live-and-let-live attitude that marked the ‘60s and ‘70s has given rise to a more intolerant brand of liberalism, which is considered (by more moderate Democrats) as a dangerous crack in San Francisco’s formerly reputable veneer. 

Show of Hands: Who Remembers Global Warming?

Sam Chapin

The words global warming used to mean something. When the term became popular in the early 1990s, it sounded like something out of a science-fiction movie. Today, however, it is thrown around casually and most people seem to have forgotten its implications. (Similarly lost is the significance of April 22 — Earth Day; don’t pretend like you remember.) Of course, there are those dutiful citizens who are doing their best to combat global warming: refusing plastic bags at the bodega; driving under 60 mph with the windows up and the air-conditioner off; and buying recycled paper towels. But the actions of a few have next to no impact on global climate change. 

What the London Riots Say About the Past, Present and Future of England

Daniel Sampson

Almost immediately after the first brick was thrown and the first was fire set, British pundits were searching for ways to explain the how and why behind what would become four straight nights of countrywide rioting, the likes of which England had not seen in a quarter of a century.

Lessons From the Failure of U.S. Propaganda in the Middle East

Christopher Moraff

Unfortunately, U.S. policymakers today seem content to follow the same disastrous path they have for more than half a century. Until the implementation of fundamental changes in U.S. policy in the Middle East — including a draw-down of militarization in the region and, even more importantly, support for a comprehensive and unbiased resolution to the issue of Israeli-Palestinian conflict —America’s rhetoric of freedom, equality and democracy will continue to fall on deaf ears.

Tearing Down the Wall

David Perry

Walter Schubert suspected, rightly, that his staff, even family members, were being disdained, harassed and bullied for nearly three months in 1996. His antagonists never slithered out to confront the elder Schubert directly, even though he was the one they were after. But he would bring the battle to them, if need be, even if it meant a brawl at Wall and New Streets. Every gay man has to know how and when to throw a punch.

A Tale From the Trenches: Unemployment 101

David Perry

Thanks to two economic recessions (2000, 2008), two company restructures, and a terrorist attack, I’ve been unemployed a total of four times, for a total of nearly six years.  Want to know the mental state of the unemployed? Let me be your guide though this particularly pot-holed landscape…

The Fellowship of the Thiel

Nataliya Nedzhvetskaya

The brainchild of PayPal co-founder Peter Thiel, the Thiel Fellowship promises to give the world’s brightest minds under 20 the opportunity to “pursue innovative scientific and technical projects, learn entrepreneurship, and begin to build the technology companies of tomorrow.”   

 

Romney's Run

Daniel Sampson

Romney could convincingly argue that amongst Republican candidates, he possesses a unique blend of fiscal conservatism and proven business acumen that makes him the obvious choice for the Republican nomination.

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