climate change

A Moment of Hope in the Politics of Climate Change

Andrew Norton

The roots of this hopeful tipping point in the politics of climate change lie in the failure to deliver on the promise of something virtually every nation in the world agreed to do. The Paris Agreement of 2015 achieved agreement and ratification by country governments at an unprecedented rate for any international agreement – and, quite remarkably, entered into force years ahead of schedule at the end of 2016, due to the political momentum generated in the international community.

Want to Help Save the Planet? Start at Home

Jennifer Vickers

When these cleaners are rinsed down the drain, they contaminate our water source.  Some of the chemicals that are washed down the drain are removed at wastewater treatment plants, but some remain, making their way back into rivers and lakes. When in the water, these toxic chemicals cause massive overgrowth of certain plants, crowding out wildlife. When the plants die in large masses, they deplete oxygen in the water, killing off more plants and marine life.  

Vivienne Westwood’s ‘Protest’ at London Fashion Week

Marie-Louise Gumuchian

Britain’s dame of fashion Vivienne Westwood gave models a voice on her catwalk. The 77-year-old, known for her environmental activism, allowed her models, which included actress and anti-harassment campaigner Rose McGowan and other campaigners, to address various issues as she presented an eclectic mix of creations. “We need more heroes,” McGowan declared on the runway.

World’s Largest Rainforests Face Political Uncertainty in 2019

Sara Stefanini

Meanwhile in Indonesia, the two presidential candidates – incumbent Joko Widodo (known as Jokowi) and ex-army officer Prabowo Subianto – have given vague promises of environmental protection but few details. That said, Jokowi, who won as an outsider populist in 2014, has done more than some expected to tackle deforestation. As of 2015, Brazil was home to 12 percent of total forest global cover, the DRC nearly 4 percent and Indonesia 2 percent, according to the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization. 

The Fight Against Trump’s Axis of Climate Deniers

Jean Su

I just returned from the 24th United Nations climate change conference in Poland, where government delegates were charged with fleshing out the rules that govern the implementation of the 2015 Paris Agreement. Unfortunately, a new axis of climate-denying nations overshadowed the talks. At this year’s negotiations, the Trump administration banded together with climate pariahs Russia and Saudi Arabia to sideline climate science and protect fossil fuel interests.

The Paris Climate Deal Alliance Is Falling Apart

Sara Stefanini

The alliance of rich, emerging and poor economies that sealed the Paris climate deal is falling apart. In 2015, the world’s top two emitters, the US and China, joined with Brazil, some small island countries and the European Union, led by Germany, France and the UK, to land the agreement. But climate change politics have shifted significantly since then, with two more big tilts this week. Brazil elected a staunch and radical anti-environmentalist president, while Germany’s Angela Merkel confirmed her exit plans

Brazil’s Bolsonaro Makes Threats Against the Amazon

Fabiano Maisonnave

Both Bolsonaro and Mourão have defended the excesses of Brazil’s military dictatorship, which displaced and killed (intentionally or through diseases) thousands of Indians in the Amazon, amid an effort to build roads and hydroelectric dams in the forest. The armed forces have never recognized any wrongdoing. “If he wins, he will institutionalize genocide,” says Dinamam Tuxá, the national coordinator of Brazil’s Association of Indigenous Peoples, in a phone interview with Climate Home News. 

What is the U.N. Plan to Help Climate Migrants?

Megan Darby

In a report released this week, the ‘task force on displacement’ called for better data collection and analysis on climate migration trends, and finance to help those hardest hit. “The UN currently lacks a systemwide lead, coordination mechanism, or strategy on disaster displacement, including related to climate change,” wrote the authors, who mostly represent UN agencies. They called on Secretary General Antonio Guterres to develop a response.

Why British Media Changed Its Tune on Climate Change

Soila Apparicio

As the national broadcaster, the BBC reaches a lot of people. “As far as the public is concerned the BBC is the number-one source of information on climate change,” said Richard Black, director of the Energy and Climate Intelligence Unit and former BBC science and environment correspondent. “With this heatwave, the questioning has started a little bit earlier than it has done in previous years. One of the reasons is that this heatwave covers a pretty large area,” added Black.

U.K. Protestors: ‘Trump Is Willfully Wrecking the Climate’

Soila Apparicio

“[Climate change] is the single greatest threat to anything anyone holds dear,” said Max Wakefield, one of the self-appointed ‘Trump babysitters’. “We have enough on our plate dealing with the racism, sexism, so we could do without piling ecological collapse on that.” Trump’s administration has stripped regulations designed to slow global warming and the president intends to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement as soon as legally possible.

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