Tucker Carlson

Hillary, Helmets, ‘Crossfire,’ and Cash

Marty Kaplan

On the surface, the fight between the GOP and NBC is about the effects of media on audiences.  The party’s presumption – based on no evidence – is that the miniseries would put Clinton in a favorable light, and – also based on no evidence – that the halo would translate into votes.  But if a movie could do that, then John Glenn, heroically portrayed in the 1983 movie The Right Stuff, would have been the 1984 Democratic presidential nominee.  The real issue here isn’t the impact of entertainment on audiences, it’s the coup that took presidential debates out of the hands of citizens and handed them to party hacks.

The View From the Right: An Interview With Tucker Carlson

Tara Taghizadeh

Tucker Carlson is that rarity in the sea of conservatives. He has opposed the Iraq War, been a vocal critic of George W. Bush, is a devoted Grateful Dead fan to boot, and once traveled to Africa with the Rev. Al Sharpton. Carlson, along with the New York Times’ David Brooks, is the type of conservative whom liberals may disagree with, but ultimately (and perhaps grudgingly) respect. Carlson currently serves as the Daily Caller's Editor-in-Chief, an online publication he co-founded with Neil Patel, which has made its mark as a lively bastion of conservative thought, boasting millions of readers, brash and theatrical headlines, and even a "Guns and Gear" section.

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