comedy

John Cleese Discusses Something ‘Completely Different’ in ‘Professor at Large’

Sam Chapin

If you had asked me why it was funny, I probably would have yelled, “Ni!” and ran away. And I’d wager that a lot of Python faithfuls have a hard time enunciating their affections for the material--it feels so effortlessly humorous. It’s easy to forget that someone actually wrote it. In John Cleese’s new book, Professor at Large: The Cornell Years, he gives an intimate and exhaustive exploration of his creative and analytical mind, allowing us to see firsthand the inner workings of a comedic genius. 

Why the Upright Citizens Brigade Remains Relevant 20 Years On

Kaitlin Ebersol

Since opening the doors of its current location in April of 2003, the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre has offered longform improvisational and sketch comedy classes and a packed, 7-night schedule of cheap and edgy performances to a varied audience. Perhaps because the cost of entry is so low, or perhaps because of the artistic and collaborative nature of UCB improv itself, the theater exudes a noticeably low-key, friendly vibe that imbues the entire experience; it feels comfortable, like hanging out with a roomful of friends you’ve never met. 

Celebrating More Than 60 Years of a Mad, Mad World

Tara Taghizadeh

Perhaps MAD Magazine's iconic success is due to its complete lack of respect for anyone and anything. The “nothing is sacred” motto has been at the core of the publication’s superb editorials and illustrations, and from politicians to movie stars to the average Joe, all have been bitten by the Mad’s acerbic sting. From Spy vs. Spy to the toothy grin of Alfred E. Neuman, MAD has delivered chuckles to American youths with the underlying message of: Don’t take yourself too seriously because we certainly don’t. 

Subscribe to RSS - comedy