new films

‘First We Bombed New Mexico’ Spotlights Injustices Against Victims of the First Bomb Test

Ulises Duenas

One of the most shocking events the documentary explores is that just a couple of years after the bomb test, there was a surge in infant deaths among the families in the nearby towns. In the decades that followed, there was a large amount of cancer cases that were too numerous to be a coincidence or a medical anomaly. It was clear that the radioactive fallout was wreaking havoc.

‘Sunrise’ Excels at Confusing the Audience, Not Entertaining Them

Ulises Duenas

The beginning of the movie revolves around Guy Pierce’s character going on a rant about how different kinds of people aren’t meant to live together. The villain is so cartoonishly hateable that he ends up carrying the film. On the flip side, you have Alex Pettyfer who plays Fallon, the vampire who eventually decides he will do something about the evil bigot who is tormenting the town.

‘The Death Tour’ Deftly Portrays Ambitious Wrestlers Vying for Fame and Glory

Ben Friedman

The Death Tour follows wrestlers as they partake to see if they have what it takes for glory. The documentary captures the human psyche of a wrestler’s profile, and why they choose to compete. For some, they are driven by the idea of fame and glory.

The Best Films of 2023

Forrest Hartman

Christopher Nolan’s meditation on the father of the atomic bomb is tense, dramatic, and beautifully crafted from the first frame to the last. Much credit goes to Cillian Murphy, whose interpretation of the title character is worthy of an Oscar, and Robert Downey Jr., whose reading of Lewis Strauss reminds us that he is so much more than Iron Man.

'Poor Things' Is a Beautiful Film Despite an Inconsistent Plot

Ulises Duenas

The most interesting aspect of the whole film is arguably its visual design and just the general aesthetic of the film. The setting is like a mix of Victorian London with a steampunk world and traditional sci-fi setting. Many shots in the movie are fantastic eye-candy and combined with the menacing, intrusive score, the end product is both beautiful and unsettling.

'Dream Scenario' Delivers an Interesting, Surreal Film From A24

Ulises Duenas

After Paul soaks in the strange adulation from strangers, things take a turn. People’s dreams about him turn into nightmares where he begins to brutally murder people. The depiction of those nightmares feels accurate compared with real dreams; they’re not overly absurd and the imagery is disjointed and confusing when presented to the viewer.

Great Power, Great Diversity Across the Spider-Verse

Garrett Hartman

I think Peter B.’s muted presence in the film is one reason fans are so receptive to these new Spider-People. The film pays homage to the history of the character but also directs us to pay attention to the new cast. It comes across as a film that is specifically tailored for everyone. It emphasizes Spider-Man as a symbol of hope.

A Big Lie and Its Consequences Unfold in the New Comedy 'Sick Girl'

Ben Friedman

In a new video for Highbrow Magazine, contributing writer and film critic Ben Friedman reviews the new dark comedy, Sick Girl. Nina Dobrev stars as Wren, who spreads an intentional, big lie in order to rally her friends around her -- but her lie inevitably brings about unexpected consequences. Jennifer Cram wrote and directed Sick Girl, and Friedman gives the film a high rating.

‘The Re-Education of Molly Singer’ Relies on Tropes Rather Than Satire

Ulises Duenas

The movie, much like Molly’s character, tries to have its cake and eat it too. Even though there are scenes that poke fun at frats and the college party lifestyle, the film – perhaps inadvertently -- also shows those things in a positive light. I wish the script leaned more into the satire it’s clearly capable of, instead of relying on tired conventions.

‘Roots of Fire’ Offers an Expansive Look at Why Cajun Music Matters

Forrest Hartman

America, thanks in large part to its economic strength, has an outsize voice in worldwide pop culture, making it easy for subcultures and aging traditions to get swept into its melting pot. Thibodeaux and others make a compelling case for preserving our individual cultures, and filmmakers Abby Berendt Lavoi (director/producer), husband Jeremy Lavoi (director/producer) and Stephen Thorpe (sound producer) foster the conversation with gorgeous cinematography and a soundtrack that is always sharp and compelling.

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