new films

‘Splinters’ Has Good, Subtle Characters but Lacks Drama

Ulises Duenas

Paul Gordon as David is the highlight of the movie since his delivery is so awkward and dry. David seems like a boring person doing his best to impress Anna since he and his wife recently separated. He doesn’t come off as creepy and there’s a certain charm to his droning dialogue that gives the movie a comedic aspect that it needs. While David and Joan mirror Anna and Bo in some ways, they aren't as key to the overall plot as they could have been and fleshing out their characters could have added a lot more to the movie.

‘Nitram’ Is a Devastating Portrait of Isolation and Violence

D.M. Palmer

Nitram is distinguished by three outstanding but contrasting central performances. Jones has become a screen presence who evinces vulnerability and unease in equal measure, and he is sensational here. Jones conveys an inner world of rage and confusion with tremendous subtlety, lending a tragic gloss to Nitram’s childlike simplicity and blundering attempts at social engagement. It is a frank and fearless portrayal of mental illness left to its own devices.

‘Alice’ Promises Themes of Revenge and Justice, but Fails to Deliver

Ben Friedman

Keke Palmer is a talented actress who makes the most of her screen time. Unfortunately, the script is not up to par with Palmer’s dynamic and elegant performance. The character of Alice is severely underutilized. Half of the film’s runtime is devoted to life on the plantation, thus Alice’s escape and subsequent discovery that she is in the year 1973 never gets a moment to breathe. Despite Alice finding herself in a new century, the news never seems to shock Alice.

After years of Trying, DC Finally Gets the Caped Crusader Right With ‘The Batman’

Ulises Duenas

Robert Pattinson delivers a unique take on a Bruce Wayne/Batman that is consumed by his emotional trauma and is portrayed as an awkward and unstable man struggling to do his best against all odds. He’s obsessive, self-destructive, and looks like he never gets an ounce of sleep, but it all gives the character a realistic feel. The mystery at the core of the plot is very well done with the main villain, the Riddler, doing a great job of being a menacing enigma who taunts Batman at every turn.

‘Ted K’ Searches for the Disturbing Core of the Unabomber

D.M. Palmer

The film plays out like a twisted take on Walden, throwing Thoreau into the horror grinder. Tom Obzud’s sound design brings a visceral quality to Kaczynski’s activities – from the preparation of food to the construction of explosive devices, every action is imbued with a pungency that almost rises from the screen. Kaczynski is another of God’s lonely men, looking for solutions to his isolation in disturbing action, but there is no attempt to either valorize or condemn his choices.

The Tragedy of Joel Coen’s ‘Macbeth’? It Wasn’t Necessary

Forrest Hartman

The Tragedy of Macbeth, as presented by Coen and company, is a worthy piece of art, but it’s a piece of art we have largely seen before. The cast – although star-studded – is relatively small, which – again – makes the movie feel like a play (minus the live energy). Bottom line: Those who have seen good stage adaptations have seen superior work, and those who have never seen the play should prioritize a theatrical experience over watching this film.

‘The Sleeping Negro’ Executes Important Themes With Lackluster Writing and Acting

Ulises Duenas

Throughout these scenes, you can see that while Myers is obviously passionate about the subject matter of the movie, his performance and writing don’t do it justice. At its worst, this movie feels like an edgy student film made by someone who was more focused on delivering a message than making a good movie. At its best, there are scenes heavy with drama and tension that help drive those messages home because they’re delivered by characters that seem like real people.

‘Spider-Man: No Way Home’ Lives Up to the Hype

Ulises Duenas

Like Avengers: Infinity War and Endgame before it, this movie does a great job of juggling all its characters, while also giving them a good amount of development. Past villains are humanized more and given their own arcs and their interactions with past Spider-Men is highly entertaining. Holland’s performance cements him as the best Spider of the bunch, so it’s a shame that he doesn’t want to return to the role anytime soon.

'Power of the Dog' Is an Intriguing Drama, But Not the Year's Best Film

Forrest Hartman

In a new video for Highbrow Magazine, Chief Film Critic Forrest Hartman reviews Jane Campion's Power of the Dog. Starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Kirsten Dunst, the film is a great dramatic Western, replete with a poignant plot and intriguing characters. But even though Campion is a masterful storyteller, Hartman doesn't believe Power of the Dog is the best film of the year. Hartman explains why.

Steven Spielberg Revitalizes 'West Side Story' and Delivers Another Hit

Forrest Hartman

In a new video for Highbrow Magazine, Chief Film Critic Forrest Hartman discusses Steven Spielberg's new film, West Side Story -- a remake of a beloved classic. The original was a popular musical that enthralled movie audiences, and Hartman explains that Spielberg has stayed true to the film's roots, and delivered us another hit.

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