art

The Frick Art Collection Finds a New Home

Sandra Bertrand

The Fricks had the Fragonard Room rebuilt in the early 20th century to complement the artist’s Progress of Love series. Jean-Honore Fragonard (1732-1806) was a prolific French painter of the late Rococo period who painted these works for the music pavilion on Madame du Barry’s property (du Barry was the last mistress of Louis XV). Visitors will now have the rare treat of enjoying the collection in its entirety, even if the former ambience is absent.

Deana Lawson at the Guggenheim – The Black Lens Transformed

Sandra Bertrand

In recent years, Lawson has admitted to creating environments for the work itself, in order to allow for the reflection “of both looking and being looked at” she desires from her audience. Her portraits are framed in mirrored glass, so that standing at a certain angle in front of a portrait one confronts the self. Where holograms in the portraiture are embedded, does it detract or enhance the overall effect?  It’s hard to say.

The Art of the Late Daniel Johnston: Musician, Artist, and Renaissance Man

The Editors

Johnston’s songs have been covered by several hundred artists, including David Bowie and Tom Waits. The late Kurt Cobain mused that Daniel Johnston is the best songwriter in America. In 2006, his life was documented in the award-winning film, The Devil and Daniel Johnston, and his painted illustrations were exhibited in the Whitney biennial. Johnston had a lifetime battle with mental illness, and medication prescribed for this condition damaged his liver requiring multiple hospitalizations. He died from a heart attack in his sleep before the morning of September 11, 2019.

How Mid-Century Airline Travel Came to Symbolize Glamour and Adventure

M.C. Hühne

The airline industry was highly regulated until the late 1970s, when deregulation in the United States started a trend to liberalize air traffic around the world. Until then, ticket prices and the destinations an airline was allowed to serve were the main subjects of regulation. Airlines were regarded as important agents for economic growth as well as ambassadors of their home countries abroad, and regulation was to provide stable economic conditions for this promising new industry.

Is Botero the World’s Most Famous Living Artist?

Sandra Bertrand

Director Don Millar gives us insights into the artist’s processes, particularly through the reminiscences of his daughter Lina Botero Zea, who was also an executive producer on the film.  At one point, she and a brother visit a storage space for their father’s works not visited since the 1960s.  The viewer shares their excitement as they roll out the sketches, reveling in Botero’s strokes of color and endless experimentation.

Artist Zach Mendoza’s Tribute to Great Literary Heroes

The Editors

The great reverence that Mendoza has for the past (and an equal infatuation with the lurking shadow of the future) is omnipresent in his alla prima portraits, which pay tribute to his literary heroes. His combination of expressionism and neorealism embodies the era in which many of his subjects thrived. As a perpetual student of history, he draws a line from late modernism through post-contemporary art.

Immerse Yourself in Interactive Art at TeamLabPlanets Tokyo

The Editors

The celebrity-favorite and Instagram-famous teamLab Planets Tokyo has become the world’s most popular single-artist destination, drawing in more than 2 million visitors in its first year. The sprawling interactive digital artwork space allows guests to virtually walk through water and immerse themselves in an enhanced world that responds to live movement. Visitors enter the museum barefoot and become completely immersed with other visitors in the vast, enthralling spaces. The artwork is manipulated in real time by a computer program so previous visual states can never be replicated and will never reoccur -- each visitor’s experience is completely unique.

The Serious and the Smirk: The Smile in Portraiture

Nicholas Jeeves

Such is the field upon which the mouth in portraiture has been debated: an ongoing conflict between the serious and the smirk. The most famous and enduring portrait in the world functions around this very conflict. Millions of words have been devoted to the Mona Lisa and her smirk – more generously known as her ‘enigmatic smile’ — and so today it’s difficult to write about her without sensing that you’re at the back of a very long and noisy queue that stretches all the way back to 16th century Florence. 

Paying Homage to the Brilliant World of Comics and Graphic Novels

The Editors

This exhibition is curated by Kathleen Goncharov, senior surator at the museum. She recruited as her “muse” for this exhibition Calvin Reid, the senior news editor at Publishers Weekly and a leading expert in the field of comics. Reid was one of the first critics to recognize comics as a literary form for adults, and selected the comic books and graphic novels in the reading room where the public can comfortably lounge and enjoy reading (many from Reid’s own private library). 

Joan Miro: The Catalan Magician Remakes the World

Sandra Bertrand

Miro’s immersion into the prevailing Parisian scene was perfectly timed.  Andre Breton’s First Surrealist Manifesto was written in the fall of 1924, and “The Birth of the World” produced in 1925.  Predating by decades the “action painting” of Jackson Pollock, the background is a grey morass of pouring, brushing, flinging gestures to signal the explosive nature of creation, acting as the stage on which his floating shapes take their place.  Acquired by MOMA as a gift from the artist in 1972, it justifies its place of honor in this show.

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