animation

Inside the World of Animation Artist Chuck Jones

Sabeena Khosla

These are all characters embedded in American childhood and how we remember them is due to the careful process Jones employed as an animator for WB Inc. He saw his characters as actors themselves, taking anthropomorphism to a new level in the cartoon sphere. The exhibit begins with layout drawings and detailed notes Jones wrote next to the sketchy preliminary drawings of Bugs. Next to the figure he would write how to form the movement: “In a walk: humans, rabbits, or ducks, the shoulders are always an opposite angle to the hips,” and when Bugs is tired “think of a dollar sign” for his shape. 

‘Rio 2,’ ‘Under the Skin’ Arrive on DVD

Forrest Hartman

There are appealing elements in both “Rio” films, most notably director Carlos Saldanha’s colorful depiction of South American wildlife and scenery. Since “Rio 2” is a musical, Saldanha also deserves credit for collecting a nice batch of tunes and working them into his feature in organic and pleasing ways. The trouble is, these strong points are saddled to a pedestrian script. The story is set after events in the original Rio, and it is essentially an animalized version of “Meet the Parents.”

 

An Interview with Pasha Roberts, Director of ‘Silver Circle’

Snapper S. Ploen

Imagine a future where the dollar has lost its value. A future where the government has taken over housing and Americans riot in the streets over exorbitant gas prices. Considering the events of the past five years, this isn’t such a hard thing to conjure in the mind. Highbrow Magazine recently had the opportunity to review the new animated thriller, Silver Circle, by director Pasha Roberts. It’s a project that explores these economic pitfalls and how those of a certain controversial mindset might seek a resolution for those issues. 

‘Silver Circle’ Fails to Present a Compelling Storyline or Captivating Animation

Snapper S. Ploen

Although this synopsis sounds interesting and relevant to our country’s current socio-political discourse, this film is neither of those things. Director Pasha Roberts brings a potentially compelling Libertarian vision of rebellion to the screen but chooses to do so through an animation style that is too stunted for genuine emotional impact. In speaking with the director, he admits the budget was limited, but even South Park’s creators were able to deliver social commentary that was enlightening and entertaining with limited financial resources. In addition, the animation isn’t the only thing holding the film back. 

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