Photo Essay: The Antique Cars of Cuba Get a New Life

Eliot Hess

 

Returning to Cuba after a six-year absence, I was surprised to see that many of the old cars from the 1940s and 1950s  were newly refurbished and being used as taxis and touring cars. I learned that their owners were now allowed to use them as commercial vehicles if they fixed them to certain standards. A number of the old cars are still in bad shape, but to see so many revitalized and brought back to life is good news for these iconic cars that have been a longtime symbol of Cuban society and culture.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

©Copyright Eliot Hess

 

Photographer Bio:

 

Eliot Hess is a lifestyle and travel photographer. His work reveals the culture, history and beauty of Cuba, Colombia, India, Ireland, Morocco, Peru, Croatia, Southeast Asia, and elsewhere throughout the World. He lives in Miami Beach and travels frequently to photograph.

 

Hess is also the co-owner of HWH PR, a leading high-tech public relations agency, and author of bestselling The Munchies Eatbook published by Random House. He is also an investor in upcoming Broadway projects and is one of the largest mystery book collectors in the United States. He and his wife Lois Whitman-Hess have an extensive contemporary art collection including works by Hung Liu, Jefro Williams, Asad Faulwell, Jairo Alfonso, and Ariamna Contino. They have one daughter. For more information, visit: www.eliothess.com or on Instagram: eliothess.

 

Eliot Hess’s previous photo essays for Highbrow Magazine include:

 

The Photographs of Eliot Hess: Japan

 

The Magic and Beauty of India: A Photo Essay

 

 A Photographer’s Journey in Scenic Ireland

 

Highbrow Magazine

 

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Eliot Hess (printed with permission)
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