Havana

Artists Fight Increasing Censorship in Cuba

Sarah Marsh

In a country that frowns on public dissent, Otero Alcantara has led a rare campaign against the measure, known as Decree 349, by dozens of artists working outside state institutions. Together they have flooded social media with slogans like “Law that converts art into a crime,” hosted musical and other artistic performances in protest at the decree and sent letters to authorities.

 

Yosvany Terry Brings His Afro-Cuban Brand of Jazz to D.C.

Eve M. Ferguson

Born into a musical family, Terry’s father Eladio “Don Pancho” Terry was a bandleader, violinist and master shekere player in his hometown of Camaguey, which has also produced other Cuban musical luminaries such as Omar Sosa. Schooled at the prestigious National School of Arts (ENA) and Amadeo Roldan Conservatory in Havana, Yosvany aspired to play the violin like his father, but was instead guided to the saxophone and continues his father’s unique playing style on the shekere.

Traveling to Cuba in the Era of Trump

Barbara Noe Kennedy

Americans are flat-out prohibited from freely traveling to Cuba like Europeans and Canadians. You can’t just plop down on a golden-sand beach and drink mojitos all day. And individual people-to-people education trips, one of the main ways that Americans previously could visit Cuba, have been scratched. That said, there are 12 categories of travel that still allow Americans to travel to Cuba, including family visits, and group people-to-people travel (including religious and educational trips). 

With Fidel Gone, Cubans Hope to Reclaim Assets

Louis E.V. Nevaer

Before that can be answered, it’s important to distinguish between companies and individuals. American companies that had their assets seized—from Citibank to Hilton Hotels—have long registered their losses with the appropriate authorities. Some, such as Bacardi Rum, have successfully sued—and won—for trademark violations. But what of individuals, the people who lost their homes, their companies, their interests?

How the U.S. Should Really View Cuba

Jesse L. Jackson, Sr.

First, in many ways, the president’s initiative to normalize relations with Cuba isn’t so much ending their isolation as ending ours. Cuba has enjoyed good and growing relations with our neighbors across the hemisphere for years. In recent years, those countries have threatened to exclude the U.S. from hemispheric meetings if we continued to demand Cuba’s exclusion. We have sought to isolate Cuba for over 50 years; we ended up isolating ourselves.

Cuba in Waiting: Capitalism (and Reforms) Have Not Arrived

Louis Nevaer

Six months after the United States and Cuba resumed full diplomatic relations, the expectation that the resumption of ties would encourage changes in Cuban society has not been met. On the contrary, the Raúl Castro’s regime has increased arbitrary arrests of dissidents and brutal attacks on the Ladies in White, a pacifist group of wives and mothers of the arrested who march through the streets dressed in white and in silence, dampening hopes of the exhausted Cuban nation that change would finally arrive.

Capitalism Arrives in Cuba

Louis Nevaer

A stroll through Old Havana is enough to convince anyone that the entrepreneurial spirit that is fast-transforming this city into a nation of shopkeepers is in full swing. This isn’t to say that corporate America is about to descend on this island nation of 12 million people. Raúl Castro’s reforms place sharp restrictions on capitalism: one can work for one’s self, but only the state can hire more than two employees. 

Recent Housing Boom Draws Exiles Back to Cuba

Louis E.V. Nevaer

Just over a year after the Cuban government permitted the first sale of real estate between private parties, a housing boom is emerging in Havana. Fueled by an influx of foreign capital, much of it from Mexico, for Cuban exiles the boom is proving to be a major draw. It also comes amid signs that the Castro regime, which has ruled Cuba since 1959, may be nearing its end. Since November of 2011, when the country saw its first real estate deal in half a century, there has been a sustained rise in housing prices, particularly in Havana. 

More Than 50 Years Later, the Spirit of Revolution Lives On in Cuba

Roger Burbach

In Cuba change is in the air. But such change should not be read as an end to the revolution. “The United States and the exile community are dead wrong if they think that regime change will take place at any time in the near future,” said Julio Diaz Vazquez, a professor at the Center for Investigations of the International Economy at the University of Havana. Whether one talks to government and Communist Party officials, university professors, or simply to people on the street, it is clear that in Cuba, socialism is very much alive and well.

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