Washington Post

U.N.: Justice Must be Served Over Khashoggi Killing

Jonas Ekblom and Jorrit Donner-Wittkopf

Agnes Callamard, the United Nations rapporteur for extrajudicial executions, called for more action from the European Union and the United States over Khashoggi’s murder by Saudi operatives at Riyadh’s consulate in Istanbul in 2018. “I think it is important to recognize that the international community so far has failed in its duty to ensure that there cannot be immunity or impunity for the killing of Jamal Khashoggi,” Callamard told reporters in Brussels.

The Ongoing Power Struggle Between the White House and the FBI

Jim Jaffe

The idea that Felt simply changed his procedural and cultural spots because he was so offended by the misdeeds of the Nixon Administration requires an enormous amount of blind faith about human nature. Clearly FBI directors are much more overtly political than they once were. Finding FBI loyalty during the campaign inadequate because it now refuses to take direct orders from the White House (which it never has) may result in one of the more interesting and unreported power struggles of our day.

 

Journalist Jose Antonio Vargas Applies for Deferred Action

Mico Letargo

Pulitzer Prize-winning Filipino American journalist Jose Antonio Vargas, who is arguably the most visible undocumented immigrant in America right now, has joined 10 other fellow undocumented immigrants in applying for temporary relief from deportation proceedings under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. The 11 people applied for DACA as part of the “1 of 11 Million” campaign launched on Wednesday, August 20, at the National Press Club in Washington, DC. 

The New and (White) Face of Journalism Start-Ups

Charles D. Ellison

Diversity has always been—and for a number of reasons still is—the china-crashing elephant in the room that few really want to talk about or address. Lack of black people in the mainstream newsroom is an ongoing phenomenon that most—if not all—outlets seem unwilling to fix. Even worse is the lack of black leadership in the newsroom. But the fact remains that most demographic segments, regardless of background, still rush to bigged-up brand-name institutions as their most reliable sources for news. That won’t and shouldn’t change if you’re a rapacious consumer of information. As a result, people of color should hold these vaunted publications’ collective feet to the fire.

 

A Conversation With Henry Allen: Pulitzer Prize Winner, Artist, Renaissance Man

Tara Taghizadeh

In this day and age, there are few writers and journalists who fit the mold of the true literary great.  There is Hendrik Hertzberg of the New Yorker ; Nicholas D. Kristof of the New York Times;  Louis Menand (also of the New Yorker); and Henry Allen, the Pulitzer-prize-winning journalist, formerly of the Washington Post. God, Allen can write. For a number of young Washington-area journalists of my generation who had our eyes on the Washington Post at the start of our careers, Henry Allen’s writings represented what we hoped to achieve: the ability to craft elegant, refined, effortless prose and to present every subject matter (even the most mundane) as important and interesting.

 

The Party Politics of Sally Quinn

Maggie Hennefeld

Before the  conservative Tea Party made a pun out of American politics, emptying out histories of collective struggle and liquidating the American social safety net in one jubilant protest (because chucking valuable resources into the Boston Harbor is mythical and fun), there was Sally Quinn. The Washington Post  moderator and writer for the “On Faith” site and “The Party” column (which the Post killed in print in February 2010) and wife of the Post’s former Executive Editor Benjamin Bradlee, Sally Quinn has always felt comfortable occupying that blurry nether-zone between serious journalism and social entertainment, between party politics and festive gatherings involving large numbers of influential politicians. 

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