African Americans

GOP Voter Suppression and the Threat to Democrats

Earl Ofari Hutchinson

Voter suppression is a well-documented fact of life in American politics. The GOP has welded it as a potent weapon to assure its continued domination of American politics. The even more terrifying reality is that voter suppression has the force of law behind it. Kemp in Georgia was the crudest example of that. As secretary of state, he could legally make the call about which votes could and couldn’t be counted. The lawsuits that were filed against his blatant voter suppression were at best stopgap efforts to blunt some of the damage.

Trump Rescinds Diversity-Based College Admission Guidelines

Klarize Medenilla

However, a number of civil rights laws, including the Civil Rights Act of 1964, do address the issue of race in school admissions, and the stipulations of those laws will not be affected by the Trump administration’s retractions, which only affect the new rules put in place by President Obama. The rescission of diversity-based guidelines means that the administration will promote race-neutral methods in admissions, although the Supreme Court has repeatedly ruled that colleges and universities may use race as a holistic marker for admissions, as long as its use is “narrowly tailored.”

For Some African-Americans, Meghan Markle is Reason to Celebrate

Gina Cherelus

Brown is not a longtime devotee of all things royal, and she was not particularly interested in the House of Windsor before November. All that changed with the announcement of the wedding of the queen’s grandson to Markle, whose mother is black. “These are things that growing up I never would have thought that we would see,” Brown, 33, said, referring to a woman with African-American heritage becoming a royal in the United Kingdom. “I hope that women, but particularly black women, are able to see themselves in her and her mother, and know that there are no spaces that are not meant for us,” she said.

Comedian/Activist Dick Gregory Dies at 84

Monée Fields-White

In the 1970s, after moving to Massachusetts, Gregory became very interested in vegetarianism, nutrition and overall fitness, eventually advocating a diet of raw fruits and vegetables (this from a man who once weighed 350 pounds, drank heavily and smoked several packs of cigarettes a day). He was particularly opposed to the typical soul food diet, attributing to it much of African Americans’ disproportionate health challenges. 

Why You Should Move to Melbourne, Australia

Jennifer Neal

If you ask Melbournians what defines their culture, answers may include sport, fine dining, drinking alcohol or their bizarre, hipster-inspired obsession with coffee served by men with what I call “gourmet beards.” In fact, if you (like me) don’t drink coffee, you should probably start. Everything is decided over a coffee—from job offers to loan approvals. When I leave Melbourne, I realize that mentioning Australia to people is a fantastic exercise in unveiling how little they know about the continent down under. 

The Pride of Black Lives Matter

Angelo Franco

Exit polls showed that as many as 70 percent of African-American Californians voted in favor of Proposition 8. More in-depth studies have since shown that religion, more so than race, was a better indicative of constituents voting for or against the legislation; the study stipulated that African-Americans, being the most religious group in California, accounted for approximately 58 percent of the votes in favor of Proposition 8, while Latin-Americans almost paralleled that with 59 percent voting in favor of it. 

African-American Retirees: North Carolina's 'Reverse' Migration

Leoneda Inge

The mass exodus of millions of African Americans from the rural south to large urban areas across the United States was nothing more than great. During this Great Migration, almost half of the black adults in North Carolina left the state, most of them settling in and around New York. Now, those who left are steadily returning home to North Carolina to retire in a Great "Reverse" Migration.

Yes, You Can Measure White Privilege

Michael Harriot

Whenever anyone slips the words “white privilege” into a conversation, it immediately builds an impenetrable wall. For some white people, the words elicit an uneasy feeling because, for them, the term is accusatory without being specific. It is a nebulous concept that seemingly reduces the complex mishmash of history, racism and social phenomena to a nonspecific groupthink phrase.

Black Identity Isn’t the Only Thing Rachel Dolezal Stole

Anne Branigin

Reading In Full Color, Rachel Dolezal’s memoir, I was struck by this similarity between her and me. We both grew up fetishizing an other, aching to inhabit a skin that wasn’t our own. But for me, the experience of longing for whiteness, the need to create it and mold myself to it, would always be the reason I could never see myself as a white woman. Not so with Dolezal, who, as her book makes clear, fetishized and exoticized black identity before ultimately conjuring up a version for herself.

Soul Food: Cultural Staple or Disease Trap?

Penny Dickerson

Pork parts were cooked down for hours and seasoned with salt, onion and garlic. Chicken and fish were deep-fried in vegetable oil, and collard-green leaves as big as elephant ears were cleaned, cut and seasoned with smoked meats. Yams were candied with generous amounts of brown sugar and butter, while macaroni and cheese was prepared with abundant portions of eggs and butter. 

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