Wes Anderson

Welcome to the Wonderful, Wacky World of Wes Anderson

Christopher Karr

Still, one is hard-pressed to think of a filmmaker who’s as absolutely singular as Wes Anderson, and even harder-pressed to think of a fanbase best described as completists. I’m not sure that a casual Wes Anderson fan exists. Once you twirl into his world, it’s easy to get lost there—drunk on his outlandish, affected aesthetics, dazzled by his constricted idiosyncrasy, baffled by his reinvention of what cinematic language can look like.

Golden Globes Countdown: 2014 Was a Great Year for Film

Forrest Hartman

As we march into the new year and prepare ourselves for upcoming awards shows, it’s appropriate to reflect on the best movies of 2014. As usual, the year produced sure bets from well-known auteurs and a strong crop of art-house darlings, but we also had terrific pictures emerge from the much-derided cinematic mainstream. In fact, a number of blockbusters cracked my top 10 list.

‘Grand Budapest Hotel,’ ‘Lego Movie’ Arrive on Home Video

Forrest Hartman

Although there are many great writers and directors working in cinema today, few have voices as distinct and pleasurable as Wes Anderson’s. With films ranging from “Bottle Rocket” (1996) to “Moonrise Kingdom” (2012), Anderson has introduced moviegoers to unusual worlds, fantastical characters and bizarre settings that entertain while provoking thought. He is a manufacturer of fairytales for our modern age and, as such, his projects should be widely celebrated. 

Movies to Watch in 2014

Kate Voss

Now that the awards season is almost over, with only the Academy Awards remaining, our attention turns toward the most eagerly awaited films of 2014. This past year focused on real-life stories, with stellar accomplishments like 12 Years a Slave, American Hustle, Wolf of Wall Street, The Butler, and Mandela. However, 2014 is looking to both expand on and provide some counterpoint to this trend, with a new crop of fantasy, sci-fi, futuristic, and supernatural films, as well as historical fiction.

Golden Globes 2013: Snubs, Surprises, and Spoilers

Loren DiBlasi

Some deserving films were left out of the drama category, but thankfully, many deserving actors were awarded their due. The few exceptions most definitely include Best Actress contender Quvenzhane` Wallis, the pint-sized wonder who enchanted in the emotional and profound Beasts of the Southern Wild, as well as Paul Thomas Anderson’s The Master for Best Picture. Perhaps the film was a bit beyond its time, or perhaps star Joaquin Phoenix’s flippant comments hurt The Master’s chances. Let’s hope it wasn’t the latter, because Phoenix gives a gut-wrenching, career-best performance in the film (and thankfully he was nominated for Best Actor.) Let’s also hope that the Oscars wise up and learn from the Globes’ mistake.

‘Moonrise Kingdom,’ ‘Chernobyl Diaries’ Arrive on DVD, Blu-ray

Forrest Hartman

In a commercial film industry increasingly dominated by derivative fare, writer-director Wes Anderson is a beacon of creativity and inspiration. Anderson established himself as a force with his first feature film, 1996’s “Bottle Rocket,” and his follow-up movies – including “The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou” and “Fantastic Mr. Fox” – have been equally unique and appealing. His latest, “Moonrise Kingdom,” is set in 1965 and tells the quirky story of Sam (Jared Gilman) and Suzy (Kara Hayward), troubled 12-year-olds who run away together and hide in the countryside of a New England island. 

Welcome to the Poignant World of Filmmaker Wes Anderson

John McGovern

The sparse dialogue in Wes Anderson’s films captures detachment and suppression – a part of all human relationships. Yet, his films also portray misfortunes and difficulties we encounter with those closest to us in a warmhearted, positive light. His films manage to capture the joys of relationships, despite their challenging complexities. Anderson’s success rides largely on his unique depiction of these two conflicting sides of human behavior -- our social tendencies and our hermetic ones. 

Top Ten Comedies Every Highbrow Should Watch

Kurt Thurber

Even the most highbrow of highbrows needs to relax and, on certain days when a retreat to the solarium in a favorite alpaca sweater while sipping on a red from the Bordeaux region simply doesn’t cut it, there is another outlet. The comedic offerings of film from across the ages to relax the wary mind burdened with the world’s problems.  The highbrow thinkers of  the world can indulge in film entertainment between solving global warming by using algorithms from a Harvard library window and discussing why James Joyce hated punctuation over tea at 4 o’clock Greenwich time. 

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