longevity

Welcome to Mongolia: A Great Place to Die

Andrew North

Opioid medications still require a special form, as in most countries worldwide. But a much wider range of professionals can now prescribe them, including oncologists and family doctors. This has led to a 14-fold increase in their use in the country from 2000 to 2014, according to Mongolian Health Ministry figures. Khandsuren is an oncologist by training, and now oversees opioid prescriptions for all the hospital’s outpatients. The majority are still people with cancer, but non-cancer patients have become more common.Every district hospital in the country now has a pharmacy like this one.

Is a Radically Longer Life Span—Even Immortality—in the Cards?

Mark Goebel

The odds of humans being dealt the medical equivalent of a royal flush—eliminating disease and slowing or stopping the aging process—may not be as long as we’ve been made to believe, according to scientists.Some futurists think even more radical changes are in the offing: That humans will be able to use technology to solve “the problem of dying.”How did humans go from living an average of 35 years two centuries ago to contemplating living a century or more?

Longevity Gap Between the 'Two Americas' Links to Education

Paul Kleyman

The longevity gap between “two Americas” has widened since 1990, says a new study. One America is mostly white and well educated, and the other is ethnic or undereducated  and dying about a decade sooner than their more affluent counterparts. The gap between college-educated whites and African Americans who did not complete high school is “simply unbelievable,” stated S. Jay Olshansky, lead author of the extensive new analysis published in the August issue of the prestigious health policy journal Health Affairs

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