american food

Why Real Foodies Are Tired of the ‘Foodie’ Myth

Beth Kaiserman

The book American Foodie does not accept the fact that people are foodies without psychoanalyzing its every facet. It delves into detail about America’s current food obsession and whether food can compare with fine art. Some people think food is to millennials what music was to the baby boomers of the ‘60s and ‘70s. Millennials are now more concerned with health and mistrusting of big brand foods and government. I think the food revolution represents our larger intention of questioning everything. 

Hungry for Spice: The Story of Hot Sauce in America

Beth Kaiserman

The first bottled cayenne sauces appeared in 1807 in Massachusetts, and the oldest surviving commercial hot sauce is Tabasco. The first recorded crop of Tabasco chiles was in 1849 in New Orleans on a plantation owned by Colonel Maunsell White, who advertised a hot sauce using the chiles in 1859. He then gave the recipe and seeds to his friend, Edmund McIlhenny, who began planting on Avery Island. Production was halted due to the Civil War, and the McIlhennys relocated to San Antonio, Texas. Operation picked up again in 1868, and the sauce sold for $1 per bottle. The sauce was patented in 1870.

From Bagels to Food Trucks: America’s Food Legacy Abroad

Evelyn Robinson

McDonald’s might have taken off in France years ago, but it was the introduction of something even more casual that has the trendiest of Parisians talking today. Within the past year, something very American has been stirring on the streets of Paris. In a land that very recently was at the forefront of declaring that American food was nothing more than grease and a lack of imagination, suddenly, there is no greater praise for food amongst the young Parisians than “très Brooklyn,” a term that has come to symbolize something particularly cool and of high quality, not in spite of but because of its informality and creativity.

Subscribe to RSS - american food