Photography & Art

Pathos and Minimalism: Doris Salcedo at the Guggenheim

Sabeena Khosla

Constructing memorials to those lost in conflict requires simultaneously painting with both a broad and fine-toothed brush (metaphorically speaking). The artist should not ignore nuanced suffering, yet the main goal is at the service of events that affect people en masse. While Doris Salcedo’s pieces, focusing on the Colombian Civil War, do not employ the typical tropes of memorials, they are still imbued with the sensitivity required of them due to her process and personal history, having lost family members to the conflict.

From Handles to Cyborgs, All Vie for Turner Art Prize

Michael Roddy

This year's Turner Prize nominees range from a collective selling handles, and costlier furnishings, online for 15 pounds ($23) a pop to a video display in which a woman talks about being brainwashed in Kentucky by aliens. Since the British contemporary art prize made a leap into the bizarre by recognizing Damien Hirst's bisected cow and calf in 1995, it has been hard to predict what the judges might include among the finalists.

The Great Andy Warhol Art Heist

Alex Dobuzinskis

Nine original Andy Warhol prints were quietly stolen from a Los Angeles movie business and replaced with fakes in an art heist that went undetected for years, police and court documents showed on Thursday. The silk screen prints worth an estimated $350,000 are from the artist's 1983 series "Endangered Species" and his 1980 "Ten Portraits of Jews of the Twentieth Century," according to a police report submitted to Los Angeles Superior Court as part of a search warrant affidavit.

Artist James Bridle Lights Up Berlin With Spies, Lies and Censorship Art

Josie Le Blond

British artist and anti-surveillance activist James Bridle is illuminating Germany with artwork exploring the darkest state secrets, cover-ups and information blackouts. Bridle's "The Glomar Response," showing this month at the newly opened Nome gallery in Berlin, resonates in a country where revelations by former U.S. National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden caused widespread outrage.

FBI Hopes Video May Solve 25-year-old $500 Million Art Heist

Scott Malone

The six-minute, 40-second video shows a white man, wearing glasses and apparently in his 50s or 60s, being let in by the guard through a rear entrance to the museum shortly after midnight on March 17, 1990, about 24 hours before the heist. The statute of limitations on the crime has long passed, meaning that if the thieves are found they will not face prosecution. 

The Art of Al Hirschfeld – The 'Line King' Reigns On

Sandra Bertrand

So distinctive were the portraits from the line king’s pen that celebrities lined up in droves to be “Hirschfelded.”  And the roll call is staggering:  Charlie Chaplin, Carol Channing, Winston Churchill, Ella Fitzgerald, Jane Fonda, Ringo Starr, Liza Minnelli and Tommy Tune, just to name a few.  Over a hundred original drawings and other ephemera from his early work in Hollywood to his latest iconic portraits for The New York Times are currently on dazzling display at the New York Historical Society.  

Banksy Murals From Detroit, Bethlehem to Be Sold in Beverly Hills

Jill Serjeant

A large street mural painted on a derelict Detroit auto factory by elusive British artist Banksy is going up for auction in Beverly Hills and could fetch up to $400,000 dollars for a local nonprofit group, Julien's Auctions said on Wednesday. The 7 feet by 7 feet mural (2.1 by 2.1 meters) called "I Remember When All This Was Trees," which was painted by Banksy on the wall of the crumbling Packard factory in Detroit in 2010.

Discovering Japanese Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Sabeena Khosla

Nestled next to the expansive, multi-floor exhibit, however, is the Japanese wing housing a long-term show dedicated to the process by which the Met was able to collect art and artifacts from Japan since the 19th century. Being acquainted with the Japanese wing of the museum might instill some disappointment as there are not a whole lot of new additions to see or information to know – however, if you go without the expectation of seeing a new take on their collection, you can have a pleasurable and familiar experience while engaging with a bit of back story. 

New York Exhibit Unravels the Culture, History of Sneakers

Alicia Powell

From rubber-soled footwear in the 1830s to a spike running shoe in the 1860s and luxury creations by designers Christian Louboutin and Prada, a new exhibit traces the history of sneakers from their humble beginnings to iconic status. "The Rise of Sneaker Culture," which opens at the Brooklyn Museum on Friday and runs through Oct.4, reveals how the comfortable athletic footwear developed as people had more leisure time and sports rose in popularity.

No Longer Empty – From Courthouse to Art Gallery and Beyond

Sandra Bertrand

Thanks to No Longer Empty, a New York-based nonprofit involved in pumping new life into community spaces abandoned or left behind, the Old Bronx Borough Courthouse is opening its doors once again.  Only this time, after being shuttered for 37 years, its walls no longer resound with the smack of a judge’s gavel.  Instead, artists, performers, and the community-at-large can enter its cavernous space and call it home.


Subscribe to RSS - Photography & Art