Coming Soon to a Restaurant Near You: Invasive Lionfish

Ben Gruber

Some of the best cooks in the world think lionfish, a venomous predatory fish which is breeding out of control and destroying marine ecosystems in the Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, is delicious.The chefs gathered in Bermuda on Wednesday for a competition dubbed the "Lionfish Throwdown" where they challenged one another to come up with the tastiest solution to the problem of invasive lionfish.

Impeaching Trump Is Not an Option Yet

Earl Ofari Hutchinson

Few subjects have been more hotly debated, scrutinized, and endlessly rehashed, than whether #45 can or will be impeached. A deluge of petitions has been circulated online, and tens of thousands of signatures have been gathered for his removal. The issue of a Trump impeachment roared back on the public and media plate at a recent anti-Trump tax disclosure rally in Washington D.C. where speaker after speaker called for his head by way of impeachment.

Proposal to Collect Social Media Data From Chinese Travelers Is Unethical

Elena Shore

Civil rights organizations are sounding the alarm over a proposal by Trump’s Customs and Border Protection (CBP) that would require visa holders from China to turn over their social media “handles.” Over 30 civil rights groups signed a letter opposing the plan, saying it would increase racial profiling, erode internet freedom and privacy, and would not be effective at advancing security.

Wall Street's 'Charging Bull' vs. the 'Fearless Girl'

Gina Cherelus and Barbara Goldberg

The sculptor of Wall Street's "Charging Bull" statue is seeing red over New York City's decision to keep in place the "Fearless Girl" sculpture that now stares it down, saying the adjacent art has changed the meaning of his work and violated his legal rights. The city's ruling to let the bronze depiction of a defiant girl remain until February 2018 just feet from the bull's flaring nostrils should be reviewed, said a lawyer for sculptor Arturo Di Modica.

Yes, You Can Measure White Privilege

Michael Harriot

Whenever anyone slips the words “white privilege” into a conversation, it immediately builds an impenetrable wall. For some white people, the words elicit an uneasy feeling because, for them, the term is accusatory without being specific. It is a nebulous concept that seemingly reduces the complex mishmash of history, racism and social phenomena to a nonspecific groupthink phrase.

The Asian Community’s Uproar Over United Airlines

Andrew Lam

The video quickly went viral around the world, including in China, one of United’s largest markets, where it broke records for being the most widely shared video on social media. United stocks quickly plummeted, dropping 4 percent early Tuesday. Many of the comments in China and elsewhere, meanwhile, questioned whether Dao, initially believed to be Chinese, was singled out for his ethnicity. His bleeding face is now the poster child for perceived racism in the friendly skies. 

Photographer Nan Goldin and a Long-Lost Era of New York Subculture

Sandra Bertrand

It’s easy to see Goldin as the heir apparent to Diane Arbus.  Both precocious, both raised by Jewish parents preoccupied with their own successes or obsessions, as young women they were, more often than not, left to their own devices.  Free to seek outlets to a world beyond the narrow scope of their upbringing, they chose a descent into a netherworld.  Whether through an insatiable curiosity in Arbus’ case or an obsessive dependency in Goldin’s, it was a dangerous journey.  

Black Identity Isn’t the Only Thing Rachel Dolezal Stole

Anne Branigin

Reading In Full Color, Rachel Dolezal’s memoir, I was struck by this similarity between her and me. We both grew up fetishizing an other, aching to inhabit a skin that wasn’t our own. But for me, the experience of longing for whiteness, the need to create it and mold myself to it, would always be the reason I could never see myself as a white woman. Not so with Dolezal, who, as her book makes clear, fetishized and exoticized black identity before ultimately conjuring up a version for herself.

Neil Gorsuch Will Be the Next Clarence Thomas

Earl Ofari Hutchinson

Even worse than the GOP’s ramming Neil Gorsuch on the high court, is what Gorsuch is now poised potentially to do on the SCOTUS. He can comfortably over the coming years do exactly what his Constitutional Originalist Siamese Twin Clarence Thomas vowed that he would do and has been as good as his word. That’s take revenge in his dissents, opinions, writings, and most importantly, rulings on the most crucial cases of the era against his opponents.

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