Food

Why Coffee Culture Continues to Evolve

Beth Kaiserman

Drip coffee. French press. Espresso. Double espresso. Cold brew. Latte on draft. There are very few things people are as loyal to as they are to their favorite coffee - from bean to brew method to barista. We consume 12 billion pounds of coffee per year worldwide. About 83 percent of adults in the U.S. consume coffee. Ninety percent of coffee production takes place in developing countries, with Brazil at the number one spot.

 

Drink to Your Health: How the Bone Broth Trend Gained Momentum

Beth Kaiserman

Bone broth was the first big food trend in 2015, and so far, it’s stuck. Though not everyone has replaced their morning coffee with chicken broth, the trend has appeared on restaurant menus, in health advice columns and has even inspired its own recipe books. An incredibly simple and primitive idea, serving bone broth dates back to mid-18th century France, where it was served at inns and known as a restoratif, inspiring the word ‘restaurant.’

Why Southern Food Hits the Spot

Beth Kaiserman

The South is an area known for its struggles and its dichotomies - its lush landscape saw slavery tarnish its beauty. The South is a place with a rich array of luscious and hearty foods, but it’s also a place where food and place have been completely intertwined. Of course slavery serves as the ultimate example of Southern struggle and contradiction. According to PBS, corn was grown on the larger plantations, while smaller ones stuck to the profitable cotton crop. It was grown by slaves to make up most of their diet.

The Extent of our Great Love Affair With Cheese

Ely Marie

Regardless of how cheese came about, it is evident that cheese production has significantly increased and found its way to nearly every continent on the face of earth. Cheese has evolved culturally, with new variations birthed from creativity and a passion for all things cheese. Fairly new cheeses to the market, which arrived only about 500 years ago, include Gouda, Parmesan, and Cheddar. It is surprising to learn that these more poplar cheeses are relative babies when compared to its ancient counterparts, such as the curd varieties. 

Hungry for Spice: The Story of Hot Sauce in America

Beth Kaiserman

The first bottled cayenne sauces appeared in 1807 in Massachusetts, and the oldest surviving commercial hot sauce is Tabasco. The first recorded crop of Tabasco chiles was in 1849 in New Orleans on a plantation owned by Colonel Maunsell White, who advertised a hot sauce using the chiles in 1859. He then gave the recipe and seeds to his friend, Edmund McIlhenny, who began planting on Avery Island. Production was halted due to the Civil War, and the McIlhennys relocated to San Antonio, Texas. Operation picked up again in 1868, and the sauce sold for $1 per bottle. The sauce was patented in 1870.

Hong Kong’s Newest Culinary Hotspots

Paul Ehrlich

But forge on to the mains, which should not be missed. Billed as “Kick Ass MaC & Cheese,” this creamy delicious kid-friendly dish is here made with Argentinian pork sausage, organic mixed cheeses and crumbs; or grilled king prawns in Singapore black pepper sauces served with fried buns, which, Goldstein notes, he learned how to make “from my Uncle Raymond in Singapore;” or roasted salmon steak with Thai yellow egg crab curry and crispy garlic bread, a dish he mastered “from my Thai chef Pachuen at the Aberdeen Marina Club.” 

Manhattan’s Lower East Side: Land of Delicious Diversity

Beth Kaiserman

When touring guests around New York City, one usually hopes to spend ample time outside the hectic hoopla of Times Square, Midtown and Union Square. Food people know that the best stuff lies in the outskirts, and though it can still be difficult getting get people “all the way” to Brooklyn, most tourists will at least take a trip to the Lower East Side, just across the bridge from Brooklyn but still in Manhattan’s borders.

Exploring Vancouver’s Thriving Culinary Scene

Beth Kaiserman

Lindsay O’Donnell works in marketing for Whole Foods and writes a vegan food blog. She grew up in Vancouver and lives there now. “Everyone’s a total health nut. It’s really multicultural. There’s a lot of Asian fusion everywhere and seafood and poutine and things like that. Vancouver is definitely like a yoga hippie city.” Instead of showing off their Chanel or Nike labels, O’Donnell said people brand themselves with coconut water, a yoga mat, and knowledge of the latest food cleanse.

From Korean Tacos to Kimchi Fries: The Next Wave of Street Food

Jane Han

While Korean tacos are all the rage, the wildly popular Austin food truck has moved onto something even better – fries, on steroids. The Tex-Mex Korean fusion dish became so popular, it instantly put Chi’Lantro on the competitive food truck map, right up against other mega mobile eateries across the U.S. Now running five trucks in Austin and Houston, owner Jae Kim may come off as some kind of French Fries master.

How New York City Embraced the Chocolate Revolution

Angelo Franco

In more recent times, however, chocolate buyers have been inundated with new terms and compound words printed on the labels of this much sought-after sweet.   Artisan, single origin, blend, percentage, fair trade, are a few relatively new designations given to chocolate bars found everywhere from supermarket chains to small gourmet shops.  One of the newest of these nomenclatures is bean-to-bar.

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