Food

How Sugar Gets Between Us and Better Health

Sheryl Huggins Salomon

My love affair with sugar was deep, unruly and destructive. Over the years, as my weight fluctuated, the affair would lure me into unhealthy and frequent transactions with “the Carrot Cake Man” of Philadelphia (his bakery was just down the street from my home!) and convince me that it was totally healthy to eat a massive slice of Mississippi mud pie in one sitting, as long as it was vegan. 

Exploring D.C.’s Wine Country

Barbara Noe Kennedy

The winery business has long been tricky in Virginia, despite the fact that colonial explorers discovered masses of grapes fostering huge hopes for a prosperous industry. Ask Mr. Renaissance Man himself, Thomas Jefferson, who first encouraged Americans to drink wine with meals back in the 1700s. For 30 years he attempted to cultivate European wine grapes on his Monticello estate, but failed to produce even a single bottle. In the 1800s, the wine gauge shifted slightly as Virginia winemakers using native grapes began garnering attention. 

Soul Food: Cultural Staple or Disease Trap?

Penny Dickerson

Pork parts were cooked down for hours and seasoned with salt, onion and garlic. Chicken and fish were deep-fried in vegetable oil, and collard-green leaves as big as elephant ears were cleaned, cut and seasoned with smoked meats. Yams were candied with generous amounts of brown sugar and butter, while macaroni and cheese was prepared with abundant portions of eggs and butter. 

Farewell to Carnegie Deli, a New York Icon

Beth Kaiserman

Even if you’ve never been to New York, you’ve probably heard of the Carnegie Deli. Despite issues in recent years, including a 10-month shutdown in 2015, it’s survived as a supreme New York City icon. The announcement that it will close its doors Dec. 31 came as a shock. The New York institution has been open since 1937 and always has lines out the door, due to its fame and proximity to Times Square, Carnegie Hall and Central Park.

A Brief History of the Doughnut

Beth Kaiserman

The “doughnut” came to Manhattan under the Dutch name olykoeks, or “oily cakes,” according to a Smithsonian article. In mid-19th century New England, a ship captain’s mother named Elizabeth Gregory made her son fried dough with nuts in the middle to take on his long journeys. Her son lay claim to putting the hole in the middle, possibly to skewer it onto the ship’s wheel as he was steering, or possibly for easier digestion. Others claim the hole was made to cut back on ingredients, or to get rid of the soggy, undercooked center.

The War Over Vietnamese Cuisine

Andrew Lam

People take pride in the food they eat, and ethnic communities especially form and retain their identities around their traditional cuisines. What’s Italian without pasta? Or Thai without their Tom Yum Goong? For the Vietnamese, it is, of course, pho soup, that delectable and aromatic noodle dish that has had Vietnamese fighting each other over how best to make it—northerners and southerners have their own interpretation—and pho now finds itself in a controversy over a video made by Bon Appétit featuring a white chef telling people how to enjoy the dish. 

How to Eat Like a Local in New York City

Beth Kaiserman

Visiting New York City is overwhelming. There are the flashing lights, tall buildings, eclectic outfits and hot, smelly subways. Any visit to NYC requires proper sustenance to survive the city’s hurdles. But figuring out what to eat can be the most stressful task in a city where the tasty options never end. Here are 10 food experiences you should have while visiting NYC. 

Why Real Foodies Are Tired of the ‘Foodie’ Myth

Beth Kaiserman

The book American Foodie does not accept the fact that people are foodies without psychoanalyzing its every facet. It delves into detail about America’s current food obsession and whether food can compare with fine art. Some people think food is to millennials what music was to the baby boomers of the ‘60s and ‘70s. Millennials are now more concerned with health and mistrusting of big brand foods and government. I think the food revolution represents our larger intention of questioning everything. 

Where to Find the Best Bagels in New York City

Beth Kaiserman

When you live in a city that freaks out over a rainbow bagel, and then freaks out when it can no longer get a rainbow bagel, you tend to know a thing or two about our round, doughy friends. Though not as ubiquitous as I thought they would be in New York City, bagels still play a major part in New York living. The hangover bagel. The brunch with parents bagel. The desperate dinner bagel. And the bagels keep on spinning.

The Hunt for the Ultimate Taco in New York City

Beth Kaiserman

But tacos are one ferocious reason for debate. Anyone who’s lived in California at any point usually detests all of New York’s taco options. Others who rely on tacos for cheap and hearty sustenance during or after a night of drinking have their own special spots that serve “the best” breakfast taco to cure their pain. The problem is, most breakfast tacos are amazing after a night of picklebacks and bad decisions. How can we trust these folks to know what good tacos are?

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