Media

Can Anyone Stop the FCC From Approving a Conservative News Empire?

John Light

Just months ago, this sort of merger would have been illegal. For years, FCC rules prevented any one owner of local news stations from reaching too many Americans, or from owning more than one station in a single community. But Pai, who spent the day before Trump’s inauguration with Sinclair’s CEO, has been moving quickly to clear these regulations away so that Sinclair can move forward with its plans to grow larger.

A Breakdown of Black Stars on Forbes’ Highest-Paid Celebrities List

Michael Harriot

Every year, Forbes magazine ranks the highest-paid “front of the camera” celebrities. These rankings are based on stars’ pretax income, this year from June 1, 2016, through June 1, 2017, calculated from box-office earnings, music rankings, book sales, two paycheck stubs, how they ball out at the club and their mamas’ bragging at church. While the list is compiled by extensive research, after viewing this year’s collection of talent, we had a few thoughts about the black celebrities ranked on the list.

No, Not All Opinion Shows Are Trash

Michael Arceneaux

Ted Koppel performed a great service to his country in telling Sean Hannity to his face that he was “bad for America.” Hannity can simmer in his lingering anger over the widely shared clip that originally aired on CBS Sunday Morning as he sees fit, but it does not absolve him of the sins that led Koppel to make the statement. Hannity may be a successful cable host, but he is also a proven liar and a man known to make comments that ping-pong back and forth between fatuous and flat-out prejudiced. 

The Black Press Faces New Reality in the Era of a Trump Presidency

Jason Johnson

There is political turnover after every election, but off-the-record conversations with African-American journalists reveal a simple supposition: Once Obama is no longer in office, networks will no longer feel the need to employ as many African Americans on-screen, and the election of Trump may hasten that process. Whether or not this is actually true, this is the sentiment of many journalists and pundits of color I’ve spoken to.

African-American Publishers Announce ‘State of Emergency’ in U.S.

D. Kevin McNeir

And during a press conference on Friday, Sept. 23, the leaders of the organization who represent a collective of 211 Black-owned newspapers in 32 states with a reach that extends to 20.1 million readers per week, said they intend to raise their voices in solidarity while issuing a list of four recommended action items that they’ll deliver to President Barack Obama, U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch and members of Congress.

From Horror to Fiction to Fantasy: Listening to Podcasts

Adam Gravano

Among these selections, one can find a promising and entertaining array of audio fiction podcasts. Be they audio fiction magazines, serials, or recordings of public domain e-books published by Librivox, there are plenty of opportunities for enlivening a monotonous drive. Some particularly choice cuts are in genre fiction, particularly horror and weird fiction-themed podcasts. For the uninitiated, weird fiction is the genre at the convergence of horror, fantasy, and science fiction; it's a sort of melange of a few genre categories most associable with H. P. Lovecraft, Algernon Blackwood, M. R. James and Bram Stoker, among many others.

End of an Era: ‘Ebony’ and ‘Jet’ Magazines Have Been Sold

Frederick H. Lowe

The deal, which was signed in May and disclosed Tuesday, includes the assumption of JPC’s debt. It also continues the dismantling of Johnson Publishing Co., an iconic black-owned business founded in 1942 by brilliant entrepreneur John H. Johnson with the publication of “Negro Digest.” Mr. Johnson died in 2005. Even the name Johnson Publishing Co. may eventually disappear.

Meet the Staff at Highbrow Magazine: Chief Art Critic Sandra Bertrand

Sandra Bertrand

For the last several decades, I have been actively pursuing my interests in the fine arts.  My writing has encompassed plays, articles and reviews on many aspects of the fine arts, i.e., paintings, film, theatre, books and the popular culture at large. My travels have recently taken me to Crete, Greece, Peru, Belize, Puerto Rico, Costa Rica, Spain, and wherever the muse calls.  My own paintings are often the result of these wanderings and I am an active member of the National Association of Women Artists, (NAWA). As Chief Art Critic for Highbrow Magazine, and a long time resident of New York City, I love covering the art scene in museums, galleries and venues, reading the pulse in one of the most fascinating places on the planet.

Meet the Staff at Highbrow Magazine: Chief Features Writer Angelo Franco

Angelo Franco

I once wrote a letter to Junot Diaz and asked him if he could adopt me. He didn’t reply plus, it turns out, I am legally someone’s son already so that plan was meant to fail from the start. If I’m crying while riding the subway, it’s likely because I lost my MetroCard or I am rereading a Gabriel García Márquez novel. I often tell people they should learn Spanish just so they could read his works in his native tongue. 

Meet the Staff at Highbrow Magazine: Food Critic Beth Kaiserman

Beth Kaiserman

Beth Kaiserman is a food writer and service industry professional in Brooklyn. She is originally from Pittsburgh, Pa. She is a food critic at Highbrow Magazine, where she has written extensively about current trends in the food scene and various "foodie" destinations. Kaiserman explains that she became a writer because " I love exploring new ideas and telling people's stories. Almost everyone I interview has something interesting to say that broadens my knowledge."

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