Media

Meet the Staff at Highbrow Magazine: Food Critic Beth Kaiserman

Beth Kaiserman

Beth Kaiserman is a food writer and service industry professional in Brooklyn. She is originally from Pittsburgh, Pa. She is a food critic at Highbrow Magazine, where she has written extensively about current trends in the food scene and various "foodie" destinations. Kaiserman explains that she became a writer because " I love exploring new ideas and telling people's stories. Almost everyone I interview has something interesting to say that broadens my knowledge."

Magazine’s Anti-Trump Editorial Ignites Republican Debate

Steve Holland

An influential conservative magazine's rejection of Donald Trump's presidential candidacy triggered a firestorm on Friday, with Republican rivals saying it is validation of what they have been saying all along: that Trump is not a conservative. With Iowa to kick off the Republican search for a presidential candidate with its Feb. 1 caucuses, Trump and his aides reacted with scorn to the editorial in National Review, which was signed by 22 prominent conservative intellectuals.

Jon Stewart Steps Away From Comedy Gold as U.S. Election Heats Up

Jill Serjeant

Heartbroken fans are wishing Jon Stewart a "jonvoyage" on Twitter, but Donald Trump and the other 2016 U.S. presidential candidates may be breathing a sigh of relief. Stewart steps down from "The Daily Show" on Thursday after 16 years of biting political and media satire just as the presidential election campaign - a comedy gold mine - heats up.

NBC Fires Trump, Drops Pageants Due to Presidential Candidate's Insults

Grant McCool

NBC cut ties with U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump and the "Miss USA" and "Miss Universe" pageants on Monday after the real estate developer and TV personality made comments insulting Mexicans earlier this month. The pageants, part of a 50/50 joint venture with NBCUniversal for the English-language broadcasts that together have in the past year attracted 13 million viewers, would no longer air on NBC.

Brian Williams Will Not Return to Anchor Desk at NBC

Will Dunham

Television newsman Brian Williams, suspended by NBC in February for fabricating a story that he had come under fire on a helicopter during the Iraq war, will not return as anchor of the network's "Nightly News" program, CNN reported on Wednesday. CNN, citing unnamed sources, reported that NBC and Williams had reached a tentative agreement to keep him at the network after his six-month suspension ends in August.

Acclaimed N.Y. Times Writer David Carr Dies at 58

Curtis Skinner

New York Times media columnist David Carr collapsed at the newspaper's office and died on Thursday, the paper reported. He was 58. Carr penned the widely read Media Equation column that appeared in the Monday business section and focused on "media as it intersects with business, culture and government," according to his biography on the New York Times website.

NBC Anchor Brian Williams Goes Off the Air for Several Days

Christian Plumb and Victoria Cavaliere

NBC News anchor Brian Williams said on Saturday he was taking himself off the evening newscast for several days, responding to intense criticism over his claims that he rode in a helicopter that was hit by a rocket-propelled grenade in Iraq a decade ago. "In the midst of a career spent covering and consuming news, it has become painfully apparent to me that I am presently too much a part of the news, due to my actions," Williams said.

A History of U.S. Media Segregation

James McGrath Morris

Missing among the many reasons given for the enormous and unchanging racial divide regarding the fairness of the American judicial system is the legacy of the long history of media segregation. During America’s Jim Crow years not only did African Americans maintain lives apart from white America but so did their media. “To most white Americans the black press was a voice unheard, its existence unknown or ignored,” explained Enoch P. Waters, an editor at the Chicago Defender.

Covering the Sidney Siege: Media Should Think First, Broadcast Later

Sandip Roy

It’s only the little caption on the upper right-hand corner that indicates that what we are seeing is not what is actually happening. Recorded earlier it says almost unobtrusively. What is likely going on? We just don’t know, says the CNN anchor. A security expert Michael Roach replies “The police want to manage the situation and not have it be controlled by the media.” 24x7 television has led us to believe we can get a ringside view into any crisis happening around the world. 

Ben Bradlee, Fabled ‘Washington Post’ Editor, Dies at 93

Richard Prince

Bradlee, who first came to the Post as a reporter in 1948, was describing his return to the newspaper in 1965 as deputy managing editor for national and international affairs. Fast forward to 1971, when Bradlee was executive editor. Jeff Himmelman, who had access to Bradlee's papers for his 2012 book, Yours in Truth: A Personal Portrait of Ben Bradlee, wrote this passage: "Every year, starting in 1969, Ben invited the top editors at the Post to a retreat at his country house on the Cacapon River in West Virginia. They called it, with some irony, 'Pugwash,' after the nuclear disarmament conferences started by Bertrand Russell in the fifties. 

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