News & Features

Show of Hands: Who Remembers Global Warming?

Sam Chapin

The words global warming used to mean something. When the term became popular in the early 1990s, it sounded like something out of a science-fiction movie. Today, however, it is thrown around casually and most people seem to have forgotten its implications. (Similarly lost is the significance of April 22 — Earth Day; don’t pretend like you remember.) Of course, there are those dutiful citizens who are doing their best to combat global warming: refusing plastic bags at the bodega; driving under 60 mph with the windows up and the air-conditioner off; and buying recycled paper towels. But the actions of a few have next to no impact on global climate change. 

What the London Riots Say About the Past, Present and Future of England

Daniel Sampson

Almost immediately after the first brick was thrown and the first was fire set, British pundits were searching for ways to explain the how and why behind what would become four straight nights of countrywide rioting, the likes of which England had not seen in a quarter of a century.

Lessons From the Failure of U.S. Propaganda in the Middle East

Christopher Moraff

Unfortunately, U.S. policymakers today seem content to follow the same disastrous path they have for more than half a century. Until the implementation of fundamental changes in U.S. policy in the Middle East — including a draw-down of militarization in the region and, even more importantly, support for a comprehensive and unbiased resolution to the issue of Israeli-Palestinian conflict —America’s rhetoric of freedom, equality and democracy will continue to fall on deaf ears.

Tearing Down the Wall

David Perry

Walter Schubert suspected, rightly, that his staff, even family members, were being disdained, harassed and bullied for nearly three months in 1996. His antagonists never slithered out to confront the elder Schubert directly, even though he was the one they were after. But he would bring the battle to them, if need be, even if it meant a brawl at Wall and New Streets. Every gay man has to know how and when to throw a punch.

A Tale From the Trenches: Unemployment 101

David Perry

Thanks to two economic recessions (2000, 2008), two company restructures, and a terrorist attack, I’ve been unemployed a total of four times, for a total of nearly six years.  Want to know the mental state of the unemployed? Let me be your guide though this particularly pot-holed landscape…

The Fellowship of the Thiel

Nataliya Nedzhvetskaya

The brainchild of PayPal co-founder Peter Thiel, the Thiel Fellowship promises to give the world’s brightest minds under 20 the opportunity to “pursue innovative scientific and technical projects, learn entrepreneurship, and begin to build the technology companies of tomorrow.”   

 

Romney's Run

Daniel Sampson

Romney could convincingly argue that amongst Republican candidates, he possesses a unique blend of fiscal conservatism and proven business acumen that makes him the obvious choice for the Republican nomination.

Good vs. Evil: Managing the Technology Evolution

David Perry

So you’re a Luddite. Technology overwhelms you, and you reject it. You desire a world without all the nagging bells and whistles, tubes and wires of technology, a poetic “noble savage” existence in harmony with nature.The profusion of technology in the last 40 years has never been more brilliant, but that light reveals some starkly opposed visions.

 

Sartorial Colonialism: How the Suit Conquered the World

Reynard Loki

Imagine Gandhi. What is he wearing? Chances are your mind’s eye sees him in a simple piece of white fabric wrapped around his waist and legs. He’s wearing a dhoti, a seven-yard-long rectangular piece of unstitched cloth that is the traditional garb for men in Bangladesh, India and Sri Lanka.

 

But before Gandhi became the leader of the Indian independence movement and the inspiration for freedom fighters everywhere, he was a barrister who studied law at University College London. And at the time, he wore a suit.

 

In Defense of Rep. Weiner (and Other Scandal-Ridden Politicians)

Sam Chapin

In 1998, President Bill Clinton and White House intern Monica Lewinsky engaged in an act that would forever leave its mark on American politics, not to mention a certain blue dress. It was the day that doomed the reputation of one of our most popular presidents and transformed Capitol Hill into The Real World.

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