Media

Remembering Helen Thomas

Natasha Dado

Thomas covered 11 presidents from Dwight Eisenhower to Barack Obama for the United Press International and Hearst Newspapers. She wrote five books and was the first female member of the National Press Club, White House Correspondents' Association and the Gridiron Club, which announced her death. Thomas’ ability to vigorously question U.S. presidents and other high-powered officials are what made her stand out. She never shied away from asking the tough questions, or expressing unpopular views. 

As the Publishing World Goes Digital, Seniors Still Cling to Print

Peter McDermott

Last year, the Pew Research Center for the Internet and American Life announced that for the first time a majority of seniors (53 percent) use e-mail or the Internet. But a previous Pew survey revealed that most of the older set doesn’t get news from any online source. The study found that only four in 10 members of those 65-74 ever go online for news, and merely one in six members of the “Greatest Generation” (75 and over) do so.

Anonymous Blogging for a Better China

Anonymous

I live in dread that the Chinese government will find out our true identities. Even my parents do not know what I am doing. For the past few years, I have worked by day in the California criminal justice system and by night editing Free More News, a news blog that defies Chinese censors. Since we are based in the United States, we have the freedom to publish as we please. Chinese journalists do not. 

NAACP Magazine Takes Justice Scalia to Task Over Voter Rights Comments

Terrell Jermaine Starr

Anyone keen on the Supreme Court’s ongoing arguments over the legality of certain parts of the Voter Rights Act surely has not forgotten Justice Antonio Scalia‘s “racial entitlement” remarks from earlier this year–especially The Crisis, the NAACP’s flagship publication. The award-winning magazine pulled no punches with its response, using its cover to feature an illustration of Justice Scalia with a Confederate flag bandana wrapped around his mouth. 

‘Vice’ on HBO Takes Daredevil Journalism to Another Level

Yolian Cerquera

Vice possesses a mixed bag of stories loaded with thousands of news pitches that it receives daily from its 35 offices spread out across 18 countries, and which is reflected in the absurd, frightening and mind-bending situations the correspondents find themselves in. So, for those who are expecting ongoing war zone coverage reminiscent of the Dan Rather golden days of journalism, which could become tiresome and fade interest, the burly and bearded Smith promised good storytelling, which although violent, is not sensationalistic, but true to the story. 

One Small Step for the Associated Press, One Giant Leap for Media

Andrew Lam, Helen Zia and Chitra Divakaruni

: In early April the Associated Press announced that it would no longer use the word “illegal” when referring to undocumented immigrants. The decision has been hailed by immigrant rights groups and others, who say the term is a pejorative that dehumanizes large swaths of the U.S. population, immigrant and native-born alike. Authors Andrew Lam, Helen Zia and Chitra Divakaruni offer their own views on the term “illegal” through the lens of the immigrant experience.

FCC Chairman’s Legacy: Siding With Corporate Profit, Not Public Interest

Joseph Torres

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski’s plan to allow greater media consolidation in local markets could wipe out many of the remaining TV station owners of color left in the country. According to the latest data, people of color own just over 3 percent of all full-power TV stations — just 43 of the nation’s 1,348 stations — despite making up close to 40 percent of the U.S. population. But the FCC chairman doesn’t plan to deal with this media inequality. Instead, he wants to adopt rules that will make things worse. 

How Social Media Reacted to the Tragedy in Newton, Conn.

Andrew Lam

‎"If roads were collapsing all across the United States, killing dozens of drivers, we would surely see that as a moment to talk about what we could do to keep roads from collapsing. If terrorists were detonating bombs in port after port, you can be sure Congress would be working to upgrade the nation’s security measures. If a plague was ripping through communities, public-health officials would be working feverishly to contain it.  "Only with gun violence do we respond to repeated tragedies by saying that mourning is acceptable but discussing how to prevent more tragedies is not. 

Will the FCC Cave to Big Media?

Wade Henderson and Michael Copps

The media-dubbed “coalition of the ascendant” of women and minorities has made historic gains in our nation, yet according to the Federal Communications Commission, these communities own only a pittance of the mainstream media. Apparently not satisfied with their grip on the market, media conglomerates are lobbying the FCC to allow even more consolidation in the industry, effectively shutting the door to the development of a media that’s more reflective of our nation.

D.C.’s Largest African-American Paper Celebrates Important Legal Victory

Lafayette Barnes

The largest African-American newspaper in the District recently won the right to keep its designation to be considered for government contracts. The Washington Informer newspaper announced a settlement with the Office of the Chief Financial Officer in maintaining its status with the District government as a newspaper of general circulation and a Certified Business Enterprise. Informer Publisher Denise Rolark Barnes expressed her satisfaction with the settlement. "I am pleased with the OCFO's decision but I am still baffled by the unwarranted decision which got us here in the first place and its negative implications," Rolark Barnes said. 

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