Democrats

The View From the Right: An Interview With Tucker Carlson

Tara Taghizadeh

Tucker Carlson is that rarity in the sea of conservatives. He has opposed the Iraq War, been a vocal critic of George W. Bush, is a devoted Grateful Dead fan to boot, and once traveled to Africa with the Rev. Al Sharpton. Carlson, along with the New York Times’ David Brooks, is the type of conservative whom liberals may disagree with, but ultimately (and perhaps grudgingly) respect. Carlson currently serves as the Daily Caller's Editor-in-Chief, an online publication he co-founded with Neil Patel, which has made its mark as a lively bastion of conservative thought, boasting millions of readers, brash and theatrical headlines, and even a "Guns and Gear" section.

Henry Rollins Discusses ‘Dark Prophet,’ Clint Eastwood, and Musicians Today

Sam Chapin

Henry Rollins wears many hats. He has his musician hat (that he no longer wears), which he earned from singing with State Of Alert, Black Flag and the Rollins Band.  He has his acting hat (which still uses) that he’s worn on two dozen film sets and several television shows, including Sons of Anarchy and the forthcoming Dark Prophet. And finally, he wears his activist hat (which he never takes off). Highbrow Magazine writer Sam Chapin recently had the chance to ask Rollins a few questions about the broad spectrum of his interests and endeavors. 

Who Are the 47 Percent, Exactly?

Edward Wyckoff Williams

Mitt Romney -- whose candidacy has been characterized by more "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Romney" moments than are easily quantifiable -- is finally starting to reveal who he really is. On Monday, veteran Washington reporter David Corn of Mother Jones magazine released a video that was secretly taped in May at a private campaign fundraiser, in which Romney expresses disdain for "the 47 percent" of Americans who, according to him, don't pay federal income taxes.

The Swing Vote in This Election: 50 Million Americans Living in Poverty

Rev. Jesse L. Jackson

Nearly 50 million Americans now are in poverty. One in four children will grow up in impoverished households. Redressing poverty is a national emergency and a moral imperative. In our money-drenched political debate, the poor receive little attention. Yet they could be the swing vote in this election.

Former Green Jobs Czar Compares Obama, Romney on Environmental Issues

Ngoc Nguyen

Obama has tried to be consistent with his all-of-the-above approach [to energy]…[which] puts a big emphasis on renewables, and Romney has been all over the place on this issue... At least you know what you are getting with Obama. You have no idea what you are getting with Romney. (But) the environmental movement is going to have to push Obama the day after the election.

Obama’s Message of Hope and Change Resonates with Democrats Once Again

Sandip Roy

Obama is the poster boy of merit, of a man with no great political connections, no famous family name who rose from being a community organizer to president of the United States. But the true miracle of Barack Hussein Obama is that even though Tea Party types detest him, enough ordinary Americans, and not just those in that convention hall in Charlotte, seem to genuinely like the man.

 

Democrat v. Republican: What’s the Difference, Really?

David Barwinski

But it’s clear that most members of Congress are not really loyal to their party ideologies the way their constituents who voted them into office are.  They are loyal primarily to political expediency, which for them really means, “How will this vote affect my political career/ability to get re-elected?”   Since 2008, there has been a slight shift in voter registration as 2.5 million people have left the Democratic and Republican parties, while the ranks of the Independents has seen a modest increase. And what about when the POTUS  gets into office?  How many of his campaign promises does he actually keep?

#IHeartPresidentialElections: Obama, Romney and the Social Media War

Loren DiBlasi

Once again, the Obama campaign has done a great job of engaging voters through the two most popular social media platforms, Facebook and Twitter, with Romney right on his tails. Ironically, the candidates’ official sites appear to be nearly identical to each other; loaded with pictures, facts, and links for visitors to click if they happen to be feeling generous, they seem more like personal blogs than campaign sites. This sort of behind-the-scenes, intimate approach works well for both candidates. President Obama’s Twitter account, for example, often feels like an extension of his own diary. 

The American Spirit, Lost and Found

Thomas Adcock

The spirit of John Hancock and his gang of aristocrats——optimists all who risked their lives and property as signatories to revolution——is rare. Regrettably, that optimistic spirit——that spirit that drives all American progress——has been at historic odds with an uncharitable impulse among the American people: a selfishness that paradoxically afflicts both the afflicters and the afflicted, as we see in this election season.

Romney, Like His Republican Predecessors, Focuses on the ‘Southern Strategy’

Earl Ofari Hutchinson

Romney and Ryan, like Reagan before them, rip a page directly from the time-tested Southern Strategy playbook of Richard Nixon for GOP presidential candidates. The strategy has always had two prongs. One is to attack the liberals and bloated and tax-and-spend big government. The second is to firmly lock down the majority popular and electoral vote in the 11 old Confederate and Border states. 

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