Cityscape

Life in France During the Age of the Coronavirus

Christopher Elliot

There are long lines out the door at the grocery store. The two-meter social distancing requirement makes them look even longer. Most of the shoppers stare ahead in silence, their expressions concealed by face masks. But their eyes convey a single emotion: fear. They are afraid of getting sick, afraid of what comes next. My daily walk to the supermarket takes me past a pediatric hospital, where I see young patients infected with coronavirus being carried up to the door by their parents.

How to Rescue Your Vacation From the Coronavirus

Christopher Elliot

Jacqueline Lambert and her husband were just about to wrap up a vacation in Italy when the borders locked down. They decided to stay, renting an apartment in the Aosta Valley in Northern Italy. "We're going to enjoy the weather and beautiful scenery, which we have all to ourselves," says Lambert, a guide book author. Others are changing their itineraries before they leave. That's what happened to me last week. I had planned to spend a month in Italy, with stops in Bologna, Venice, Rome and Südtirol. Then the entire country turned into a red zone. 

 

Add These Destinations to Your 2020 Travel Bucket List

The Editors

If life in a sprawling castle sounds appealing, visit this 1,500-acre Italian estate owned by descendants of Napoleon Bonaparte. This restored medieval castle accommodates groups from 15 to 30 people, who enjoy the privacy of a private home coupled with the safety, security and amenities of a luxury hotel. Le Torri di Bagnara has an official hotel license guaranteeing the highest standards, setting it apart from other Italian villa rentals. The estate boasts an infinity saltwater pool, stone barbeque, and vegetable gardens.

The Era of the ‘Ego Tourist’

Christopher Elliot

Frequent travelers expect traffic jams and long lines. But holiday travel brings out the novices, says Jacqueline Whitmore, a former flight attendant and director of the Protocol School of Palm Beach. "They don't know what to expect. They get very frustrated, very quickly," she says. Whitmore has seen it herself. She worked on flights where inconsiderate newbies brought strollers the size of a Mercedes and then ordered a flight attendant to stow them.

Meet the Artists Literally Changing the Face of Medellín

The Editors

The trip takes travelers through the streets of Comunas 1 and 3—rarely seen by outsiders—with KGP’s artists as their guides. The tour spotlights the neighborhood’s graffiti and murals, and the guides share their own stories of growing up in Medellín amid its changing social fabric—and how art is playing a pivotal role in redefining their city, and their own futures. As Medellín designs a new identity, in large part thanks to the bold take of today’s youth on art and design, the geographically diverse and culturally rich nation of Colombia continues to evolve as a destination ripe for discovery.

Why North Beach Is San Francisco’s Best Neighborhood

Samar Sharifi

Despite these culinary and scenic landmines, North Beach still possesses a deep-rooted neighborhood scene, where locals know each other by name and people still slow down to get to know one another over a round of afternoon cocktails. Full disclosure: North Beach will always have a special place in my heart; it's where I stumbled into adulthood and met my husband along the way. I'm sharing a few of my neighborhood gems, but know that there are many more to explore.

The Culinary Effervescence of San Juan's Calle Loíza

Barbara Noe Kennedy

Hurricane Maria may have devastated Puerto Rico in 2017, but the island has come back with a vengeance—with a foodie twist. Granted, the dining scene already was starting to boom even before the deadly storm, but from the ruins is arising what locals call an “effervescence.” It’s as if the devastation gave chefs permission to scratch the past and start completely anew. Local ingredients are being reinvented to create culinary wonders far surpassing traditional Puerto Rican fare (as good as Puerto Rican fare is), and chefs are gaining national and international accolades for their creativity.

And the ‘Spookiest’ Places in the U.S. Are…

Dreamstime Editors

Now one of the most family-friendly and well-known zoos in the country, the land the Lincoln Park Zoo was built on was originally home to the City Cemetery. During the nearly 20-year transition from burial grounds to park, the city disinterred the bodies buried there and began to transform the landscape into what it is today. The land was a cemetery for decades before the civil war, and bodies are still dug up in the surrounding area to this day.

Glasgow’s War Against the Anguish of Urban Life

Fleur Macdonald

The rapid change in the city’s makeup was soon recognized as disastrous. Relocating workers and their families to new towns was described in mid-1960s parliamentary discussions as “skimming the cream”. In an internal review in 1971, the Scottish Office noted that the manner of population reduction was “destined within a decade or so to produce a seriously unbalanced population with a very high proportion [in central Glasgow] of the old, the very poor and the almost unemployable….”

 

And the Most Annoying Tourists Are…

Christopher Elliot

Why are travelers so loud? Yes, there's the joy of discovery. You can't help but gasp the first time you stand at the South Rim of the Grand Canyon and stare into the abyss. Or when you catch a glimpse of the Alps, the Egyptian pyramids, the Taj Mahal. But there's more going on here. It feels almost as if everyone's hearing aid has a low battery, and they're yelling at each other. It's a uniquely touristy behavior, for which there's no rational explanation.

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