The Most (and Least) Ethnically Diverse U.S. Cities

Stacy Brown

 

The District of Columbia faired quite well in a new poll that revealed the most and least ethnically diverse cities in America.

 

D.C. finished in 30th place among 297 others in the most ethnically diverse cities category. The nearby Maryland cities of Gaithersburg, Germantown, and Silver Spring, finished second, third and fourth overall, behind Jersey City, N.J.

 

Spring Valley, Nevada, rounded out the top five, according to personal-finance website WalletHub, which recently released its report, " 2019’s Most & Least Ethnically Diverse Cities."

 

Oakland, California, has the highest racial and ethnic diversity than any other city in the country, a figure that’s four times higher than in Hialeah, Florida, the city with the lowest.

 

Meanwhile, Hialeah enjoys the highest concentration of Hispanics or Latinos, at 96.44 percent, while Laconia, New Hampshire, has the highest concentration of whites, at 94.81 percent.

 

 

Additionally, according to a new study, Jackson, Mississippi, has the highest concentration of Blacks, at 81.44 percent.

 

While New York City, Oakland, San Jose, Calif., Rockville, Md., and Kent, Washington, also made the top 10, Rutland, Vermont; Wheeling, West Virginia; Laconia, New Hampshire; Miles City, Montana; and Bennington, Vermont, were identified as the five least ethnically diverse cities.

 

Barre, Vermont; Clarksburg, West Virginia; Watertown, South Dakota; Parkersburg, West Virginia; and Hialeah, Florida, comprised the rest of the 10 least ethnically diverse cities.

 

To identify the most ethnically diverse places in America, WalletHub compared more than 500 of the largest U.S. cities across three key metrics: ethno-racial diversity, linguistic diversity and birthplace diversity.

 

Havre, Montana, had the highest concentration of residents who spoke English (98.57 percent), while Hileah found itself at the opposite end with just 5.59 percent of its residents speaking English.

 

This is an excerpt from an article originally published in the Washington Informer. Read the rest of the article here.

 

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