A Taste of Beaujolais Nouveau for the New Year

Eve M. Ferguson

 

This is an excerpt from an article originally published in the Washington Informer.

 

Every year on the third Thursday of November, the word on the street in France and worldwide is the same: “Le Beaujolais Nouveau est arrive!”

 

Beaujolais Nouveau, the first wine of the harvest for the year, is the light red wine made from the handpicked Gamay grapes in the Beaujolais region of France, which also produces Beaujolais-Village red wine.

 

Considered a vin oridnaire, or local wine, which could only be sold after Dec. 15 by law, it gained popularity after the end of World War II, when the rules were relaxed on Nov. 13, 1951, and the Union Interprofessionnelle des Vins du Beaujolais (UIVB) formally set Nov. 15 as the release date for what would become known as Beaujolais Nouveau.

 

Later, the date was relaxed further to be the third Thursday in November once the wine started to be imported to North America and Asia. To take marketing advantage of Thanksgiving and the following holiday festivities through Christmas and New Year’s, Beaujolais Nouveau’s release has become an event unto itself.

 

 

Beaujolais Day has spawned several publicity events and heavy advertising, particularly by Georges Dubouef, the major producer and importer of the wine.

 

The French-American Chamber of Commerce has hosted a Beaujolais Day celebration at the Maison Française (French Embassy) on Reservoir Road in [Washington, D.C] for many years.

 

“It’s a very French event,” said Denis Chazelle, executive director of the French-American Chamber of Commerce’s D.C. chapter. “It’s festive and fun, there is good food, good music, and good wine. We do it for the community of expatriates and Francophiles who love coming to the French Embassy for such events.”

 

This is an excerpt from an article originally published in the Washington Informer.

 

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