Donald Trump’s Dangerous Isolationist Politics

Julianne Malveaux

 

This is an excerpt from an article originally published in the Washington Informer. Read the rest here.

 

Opinion:

 

Usually, I call him 45. Don’t want to feed the ego of a narcissist by calling out his name. But every shred of ignominy that is associated with this era needs to be associated with this putrid 45th president of the United States. So let’s call it, the Trump era. The era of indifference to human rights, the era of obduracy around international cooperation, the era of pugilism with our allies, the era of abdication of international leadership.

 

We are riveted by the harrowing sounds of children crying when they are torn from their parents, disgusted when we learn that even a nursing child is torn from her mother’s breast, disturbed when we hear that a child with Down syndrome is separated from her parent, angered when a Trump (yes, time to call his name) spokesperson mocks the child. And our collective anger pushed our unapologetic “leader” to sign an executive order that potentially stopped the separation of children from their parents.

 

 

At the same time, the international scandal minimized any moral authority our nation has in calling out others on human rights violations. The sound of wailing children makes it impossible for us to take a moral high road against any other country with their own human rights challenges. Thus, when U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley announced that the nation would resign from the U.N. Human Rights Council, one had to wonder if she was avoiding approbation for the inhumanity toward children at the U.S.-Mexico border, or if she had another agenda. She said that she was resigning because the group was unfair to Israel, without acknowledging that there are extreme human rights violations by Israel against Palestinians. Perhaps she was also removing the U.S. from a body that could censure us for the way children are treated at our border.

 

President Trump (yes, I’m going to call him by the name this time) has picked fights with anyone he can, isolating our country against our allies, aligning him with dictatorial opponents. He wants to be appreciated like Korean dictator Kim Jong Un, asking that people pay as much attention to him as they do to a man he once denigrated as “Little Rocket Man.” At the same time, he picks a fight against our Canadian and Mexican allies, our continental partners, because he is flexing his muscles and making the point that he does not need friends.

 

This is an excerpt from an article originally published in the Washington Informer. Read the rest here.

 

Author Bio:

Julianne Malveaux’s latest book, “Are We Better Off?: Race, Obama and Public Policy,” is available via www.amazon.com.

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