Pope Francis Defends Migrants in His Christmas Day Message

Philip Pullell

 

This is an excerpt from an article published by Reuters. Read the rest here.

 

VATICAN CITY (Reuters) - Pope Francis urged the world to let the light of Christmas pierce the “darkness in human hearts” that leads to religious persecution, social injustice, armed conflicts and fear of migrants.

 

In his “Urbi et Orbi” (to the city and the world) Christmas Day message, the 83-year-old pope called for peace in the Holy Land, Syria, Lebanon, Yemen, Iraq, Venezuela, Ukraine, and several African countries caught up in conflicts.

 

The common thread of his address to tens of thousands of people in St. Peter’s Square and millions watching or listening around the world was that change starts in the hearts of individuals.

 

“There is darkness in human hearts, yet the light of Christ is greater still,” Francis said, as he marked the seventh Christmas of his pontificate.

 

“There is darkness in personal, family, and social relationships, but the light of Christ is greater. There is darkness in economic, geopolitical and ecological conflicts, yet greater still is the light of Christ,” he said.

 

 

Francis singled out the persecution of Christians by militant groups in Burkina Faso, Mali, Niger, and Nigeria, asking God to console those who suffer for their faith.

 

On Dec. 1, at least 14 people were shot dead in an attack on a church in eastern Burkina Faso, where an Islamist insurgency has ignited ethnic and religious tensions.

 

Francis, who has been scorned by populist politicians because of his defense of refugees and migrants, dedicated a section of his address to their plight.

 

“It is injustice that makes them cross deserts and seas that become cemeteries. It is injustice that forces them to endure unspeakable forms of abuse, enslavement of every kind, and torture in inhumane detention camps,” Francis said.

 

This month, Francis called for the closing of migrant detention camps in Libya.

 

“It is injustice that turns them away from places where they might have hope for a dignified life, but instead find themselves before walls of indifference,” he said.

 

This is an excerpt from an article published by Reuters. Read the rest here.

 

Highbrow Magazine

 

Image Sources:

--Mariorrdo59 (Flickr, Creative Commons)

--Agencia Brasil (Wikimedia.org, Creative Commons)

 

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