News & Features

Hillary Clinton Launches White House Bid

Jonathan Allen and John Whitesides

Hillary Clinton cast herself as a champion for everyday Americans on Sunday, kicking off her long-awaited second run for the White House with a vow to fight for a level playing field for those recovering from tough economic times. Clinton, who begins the 2016 presidential race as a commanding Democratic front runner, entered the fray with a video announcement in which she said the economic deck was still stacked for those at the top.

Why the Upright Citizens Brigade Remains Relevant 20 Years On

Kaitlin Ebersol

Since opening the doors of its current location in April of 2003, the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre has offered longform improvisational and sketch comedy classes and a packed, 7-night schedule of cheap and edgy performances to a varied audience. Perhaps because the cost of entry is so low, or perhaps because of the artistic and collaborative nature of UCB improv itself, the theater exudes a noticeably low-key, friendly vibe that imbues the entire experience; it feels comfortable, like hanging out with a roomful of friends you’ve never met. 

Iranian President Views Nuclear Deal as Start of New Relationship With World

Babak Dehghanpisheh and Ori Lewis

Iran's president said on Friday that a framework for a nuclear deal was just the first step toward building a new relationship with the world, after Iranians greeted the announcement of the accord with celebrations in the streets. U.S. President Barack Obama also hailed what he called a "historic understanding," although diplomats cautioned that hard work lies ahead to strike a final deal. 

Germanwings Pilot Hid From Doctors That He Was Still Flying

Caroline Copley and Madeline Chambers

The Germanwings co-pilot suspected of deliberately crashing an airliner in the French Alps allegedly lied to doctors, telling them he was on sick leave rather than flying commercial planes, German daily Bild reported on Thursday. The revelation came as Germany set up a task force to learn safety lessons from the crash which killed 150 people last week.

Indiana’s Republican Governor Defends Religious Freedom Law

Alina Selyukh

Indiana Governor Mike Pence on Sunday defended a new state law that opponents worry may support discrimination against gay people, saying he had no plans to add extra protections but would consider new suggestions from state legislators. Pence, speaking on ABC's "This Week," sought to counter criticism from protesters who have spilled onto the streets of Indianapolis and others, including some corporations, after signing the Religious Freedom Restoration Act on Thursday.

A Decade After Hurricane Katrina, 81 Percent of New Orleans Homes Are Rebuilt

Staff

The 81 percent is up from 79 percent in an April 2013 survey. The survey also found 15 percent of the homes were demolished and are now empty lots, while 4 percent are only gutted or in a state of derelict. The 2 percent increase in rebuilt homes matches a similar rise of two percent from 2010 to 2013. Among the trends of rebuilding, the survey found a 6 “percent increase from 2009 to 2010 and the 9 percent rise from 2008 to 2009. 

Cultural Appropriation: Is Imitation the Sincerest Form of Flattery?

Angelo Franco

Cultural appropriation is a dicey subject, not least because there are no given parameters of what can be considered appropriation. This while some hold that it is impossible to “steal” forms of a culture in itself, and that the imitation of it is a human phenomenon that should, in fact, be celebrated.  The term has also become a point of origin for other, wider discussions, including those of race relations and even sexuality.  

The NYPD vs. De Blasio: Why the Police Should Heed the Mayor’s Words

Rebekah Frank

People took to the streets to register their disgust at the state of policing and the failure of the justice system in the United States, and to demand that all people, regardless of the color of their skin or the job that they hold, are treated equally under the law. It wasn’t asthma and obesity that killed Eric Garner as some people claimed, it was a bigoted and improperly trained police force. It was racism that killed him and racism that kept Daniel Pantaleo from standing trial for his actions.

U.S. House Republicans Face Test of Unity in Budget Votes

David Lawder

In a test of party unity, Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives on Wednesday are set to vote on the federal budget, using an unusual format meant to overcome lingering internal disagreements over defense spending. Known as a "Queen of the Hill" vote, the process will let lawmakers vote on several budget alternatives. The idea is to minimize the chances of not passing a budget at all, which would call into question Republicans' ability to govern now that they control both houses of Congress for the first time since 2006.

Greek Leader to Face Criticism During Berlin Visit

Stephen Brown

Angela Merkel and Alexis Tsipras have sought to play down the drama of the Greek leader's first official visit to Berlin on Monday, but open skepticism among the Chancellor's allies has spawned media portrayals of a western-style showdown. Unsurprisingly perhaps, German media have cast Greece's leftist prime minister as the outlaw and the conservative German Chancellor as a sheriff fighting to keep the euro zone together.

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